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The 10 Biggest American Companies

The Motley Fool logo The Motley Fool 23-07-2015

A Chevron gas marquee & a man walking in front of a General Motors poster.© Lucy Nicholson/Reuters; Bill Pugliano/Getty Images A Chevron gas marquee & a man walking in front of a General Motors poster.

These companies bring in the most annual revenue of any other publicly traded companies in the U.S.

In the land of the free and the home of the brave, bigger almost always means better, especially when it comes to revenue. These 10 American companies top the Fortune 500 list for annual revenue, but that doesn't mean each doesn't face its own challenges. Rising competition, falling prices, and a touch of mismanagement are just some of the problems these companies must address. 

But at the end of the day, these 10 American workhorses drive much of the country's growth, and most show no signs of slowing down. Click through the slideshow to find out more about America's biggest companies.

The 10 Biggest American Companies

A  CVS store in Philadelphia.© Matt Rourke/AP Photo A CVS store in Philadelphia.

10. CVS Health

Annual Revenue: $139.4 Billion

Employees: 177,800

• CVS is the largest prescription drugs retailer in the U.S.

• The company has 7,800 retail pharmacies and 900 walk-in clinics

• Second-largest benefits manager, with 65 million pharmacy benefits members

The Ford logo on a vehicle at a Ford dealership in Springfield, Ill.© Seth Perlman/AP Photo The Ford logo on a vehicle at a Ford dealership in Springfield, Ill.

9. Ford Motor Company

Annual Revenue: $144 Billion

Employees: 194,000

• While automotive sales as a whole have been up, Ford hasn’t enjoyed the same success lately

• But the company’s F-150 remains the best selling pickup truck in the U.S.

• Over the past year, Ford’s share of the U.S. auto market has remained steady at 15%

General Electric Co. (GE) logos are displayed on the outside of enclosed jet engine test tunnels at the GE Aviation Test Operations facility in Peebles, Ohio.© Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg General Electric Co. (GE) logos are displayed on the outside of enclosed jet engine test tunnels at the GE Aviation Test Operations facility in Peebles, Ohio.

8. General Electric

Annual Revenue: $148.3 Billion

Employees: 307,000

• Though a worldwide conglomerate, GE is focusing once again on energy and power

• Recently ditched its GE Capital business to focus in on the industrial sector

• Company is currently working on its largest acquisition – the purchase of French power and grid company, Alstom, for $13.8 billion

Phillips 66 gasoline station in St. Louis, Missouri.© Kate Munsch/Reuters Phillips 66 gasoline station in St. Louis, Missouri.

7. Phillips 66

Annual Revenue: $149.4 Billion

Employees: 14,000

• Main business is oil refinery

• Spun off from former parent company, ConocoPhillips, in 2012

• The company’s building out its midstream business, which has higher profit margins than its refineries

A person walks past the GM logo at the General Motors Technical Center.© Bill Pugliano/Getty Images A person walks past the GM logo at the General Motors Technical Center.

6. General Motors

Annual Revenue: $155.9 Billion

Employees: 216,000

• GM commands about 17% of the U.S. auto market

• In the wake of record-setting recalls, GM has set up a $400 million fund to pay victims

• Despite its recall setbacks, the automaker’s technology focus is driving the company forward

Stairway in Apple store.© Xiao qiang xg/Getty Images Stairway in Apple store.

5. Apple, Inc.

Annual Revenue: $182.8 Billion

Employees: 97,200

• The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus are one of the most popular iPhone lineups to date — boosting iPhone sales to 74.5 million in fiscal Q1 2015

• While the PC market is falling, Apple’s computer sales continually buck the trend

• Though not a proven success yet, the Apple Watch is the standard for smart wearables

Warren Buffett, chairman and chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway Inc.© Chris Goodney/Bloomberg Warren Buffett, chairman and chief executive officer of Berkshire Hathaway Inc.

4. Berkshire Hathaway

Annual Revenue: $194.7 Billion

Employees: 316,000

• A holding company steered by Warren Buffett, Berkshire owns subsidiaries in a myriad of businesses, from insurance to energy

• Core investments IBM and Coca-Cola have struggled as of late, leading some to question Buffet’s approach

A sign advertising gas prices is seen at a Chevron station in Los Angeles.© Lucy Nicholson/Reuters A sign advertising gas prices is seen at a Chevron station in Los Angeles.

3. Chevron

Annual Revenue: $203.8 Billion

Employees: 64,700

• Second-largest oil company in the U.S.

• The recent dip in oil prices has forced the company to pull back on oil exploration

• Problems at its $10 billion liquified natural gas (LNG) plant in Angola caused the plant to shut down in 2014, but should be up later this year

The Exxon Mobil  Adriatic LNG terminal under tow from Algeciras to Italy.© Business Wire/AP Photo The Exxon Mobil Adriatic LNG terminal under tow from Algeciras to Italy.

2. Exxon Mobil

Annual Revenue: $382.6 Billion

Employees: 83,700

• World’s largest oil company

• Revenue has been down for three consecutive years

• Though worldwide oil supply is high right now, Exxon’s focusing on growing energy demands to bring growth back to the company

Couple leaving a Walmart retail store.© Rex Features Couple leaving a Walmart retail store.

1. Walmart

Annual Revenue: $485.6 Billion

Employees: 2.2 million

• The retail juggernaut is trying to find its footing as the online retail market grows

• Despite recent revenue growth, Walmart faces stiff competition from both Amazon and higher-end grocers

• Doug McMillon took over as CEO last year, hopefully taking Walmart into its next phase


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