You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

Wisden India logo Wisden India 27-06-2016

A One-Day International match is supposed to last 100 overs but some contests are so lopsided that the game gets over in much lesser time.

The most recent example for such a no-contest was the second ODI between New Zealand and Sri Lanka in Christchurch, where the hosts chased down the 118-run target with 250 balls to spare. Wisden India looks at the top 10 largest margins of victories in ODIs, by balls remaining.

277 balls to spare: England v Canada, 1979. Winner: England

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

First in the list is the 1979 World Cup group match between England and Canada in Manchester that England won by eight wickets. Opting to bat first, Canada were shot out for just 45 in 40.3 overs, with pacers Bob Willis and Chris picking four wickets each. England lost two wickets and took 13.5 overs to get to the target, but since it was a 60 overs-a-side game, 277 more balls remained.

274 balls to spare: Sri Lanka v Zimbabwe, 2001. Winner: Sri Lanka

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

The Sri Lanka-Zimbabwe clash at the SSC in Colombo was a game in which a number of records were broken. Chaminda Vaas wreaked havoc and ran through the Zimbabwe line-up to pick 8 for 19 from his eight overs – the best bowling figures ever in an ODI. In the process, Zimbabwe were bowled out for 38 in 15.4 overs, the lowest total in an ODI then and the third lowest now.

Sri Lanka took just 4.2 overs to complete the task and won by nine wickets.

272 balls to spare: Sri Lanka v Canada, 2003. Winner: Sri Lanka

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

Sri Lanka were at it once again, this time against Canada in the 2003 World Cup game in Paarl. Vaas and Prabath Nissanka picked seven wickets between them to skittle out Canada for just 36 in 18.4 overs – the second lowest total in ODI cricket. Not a single Canada batsman got to double-digits, with five of them gone for ducks.

Sri Lanka’s batsmen completed the formalities in 4.4 overs to win by nine wickets.

264 balls to spare: New Zealand v Bangladesh, 2007. Winner: New Zealand

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

The third and final ODI of the bilateral series against Bangladesh was a perfect game for the hosts. After winning the toss and opting to bowl, Daniel Vettori returned figures of 6-2-7-5 to bowl Bangladesh out in 37.5 overs for 93 runs. And then Brendon McCullum took over and did his thing. He smashed 80 of the 95 runs that New Zealand scored and took just 28 balls to do it. The McCullum blitz that had six sixes and nine fours meant New Zealand’s chase was done and dusted in just six overs.

253 balls to spare: Australia v United States of America, 2004. Winner: Australia

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

The Champions Trophy clash between Australia and USA in Southampton was always going to be a mismatch but Michael Kasprowicz and Jason Gillespie ensured that USA’s misery didn’t last long. The pacers took four wickets each to shoot out USA for 65 in 24 overs, with the highest score being 23 and the next best contributor being extras with 14 runs.

Australia then finished the task in 7.5 overs to win by nine wickets.

252 balls to spare: New Zealand v Kenya, 2011. Winner: New Zealand

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

The group stage match between New Zealand and Kenya in the 2011 World Cup in Chennai got over in a little over two hours. Kenya opted to bat first but were blown away by New Zealand’s pace trio of Tim Southee (3 for 13), Hamish Bennett (4 for 16) and Jacob Oram (3 for 2) for just 69 runs in 23.5 overs. Martin Guptill and Brendon McCullum then took their side to a 10-wicket win in just eight overs.

250 balls to spare: New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 2015. Winner: New Zealand

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

The latest entry to the list was Monday’s clash in Christchurch. Matt Henry and Mitchell McClenaghan shared seven wickets between them to restrict Sri Lanka to 117 before Guptill went crazy with the bat, slamming an unbeaten 30-ball 93 with eight sixes and nine fours. Strike rate? A whopping 310.

The Guptill madness meant New Zealand chased down the target in 8.2 overs. It was the quickest chase for a target above 100.

244 balls to spare: Zimbabwe v Sri Lanka, 2004. Winner: Sri Lanka

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

Something about Zimbabwe brought out the beast in Sri Lanka in the early 2000s. Three years after they had bowled Zimbabwe out for 38 in Colombo, they bettered the performance, destroying them for just 35 in 18 overs – currently the lowest ODI total. Vaas, Dilhara Fernando and Farveez Maharoof shared the wickets between them and the highest score, jointly shared between extras and Dion Ebrahim, was 7.

The formalities were completed in 9.2 overs for a nine-wicket win.

244 balls to spare: Australia v West Indies, 2013. Winner: Australia

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © Wisden Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

The ongoing West Indies tour of Australia is turning out to be one-sided, and it was no different two years back. Mitchell Starc’s five-wicket haul meant West Indies were bowled out for 70 in 23.5 overs in the first ODI. Glenn Maxwell then opened the innings and did what he does best, slamming an unbeaten 35-ball 51 as Australia won in 9.2 overs.

240 balls to spare: Sri Lanka v Ireland, 2007. Winner: Sri Lanka

Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches © AP Photo Gone in 30 overs: Top 10 ODI mismatches

Sri Lanka once again showed their ruthless side, this time against Ireland in a 2007 World Cup Super-Eight clash in Grenada. Maharoof and Muttiah Muralitharan got four wickets each to dismiss Ireland for 77 in 27.4 overs before Sanath Jayasuriya (24 not out) and Mahela Jayawardene (39 not out) chased down the meagre target in 10 overs for an eight-wicket win. 



Slideshow: Cricketers and their kids

Cricketers and their kids

More from Wisden India

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon