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This is The Difference Between Brown Eggs and White Eggs

Eat This, Not That! logo Eat This, Not That! 18/6/2017
© Provided by ETNT, LLC

Finding yourself in a scramble trying to figure out the difference between brown and white eggs? We cracked down and found the answers.

When shopping for eggs, it's inevitable to notice that the brown eggs almost always cost more than the white. Some may think that one is better than the other. The truth is they’re not very different at all.

Egg shells get their color due to the types of chicken they come from. White-feathered chickens with white earlobes lay white eggs, and red-feathered chickens with red ear lobes lay brown eggs. Yes, it’s that simple.

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26 Things You Need To Know Before Buying A Carton of Eggs: <p>By Olivia Tarantino</p><p>There were some things I expected to be difficult to figure out as an adult—like which funds I should choose for my 401K and what to do when my car breaks down 200 miles from home. Figuring out which carton of eggs to buy was not one of them.</p><p>Everyone has their go-to brands when it comes to supermarket products. For example, I’ll always look for Rao’s when it comes to <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/pasta-sauce">pasta sauce</a> and Bob’s Red Mill for my steel cut oats. But after a few of my first grocery store runs post-college, I started realizing I was clueless when it came to choosing a carton of eggs. You know, those protein-packed pantry staples that are a key component of any health-minded person’s diet?</p><p>I was so clueless, in fact, that I would stand motionless in front of the egg section for minutes at a time, just staring at all the options. I heard “excuse me” more times than I’d like to admit, as hurried shoppers gently nudged me out of their way. They all seemed to have it figured out, but the nutrition junkie inside me couldn’t just grab an option and go. Should I go for the cheaper white eggs? Or were the “cage-free” brown eggs better? And what the heck does “farm fresh” even mean?</p><p>Even if you have your go-to brand, there are some carton claims that we’d bet you might not know the meaning behind. So, if you’re curious to see what exactly omega-3-enriched eggs really are or why brown eggs always cost more (and if they’re better for you), we’ve compiled the ultimate guide to deciphering those eggcellent egg carton claims. Plus, we’ve added a few brands to look out for when you’re shopping! Not a huge fan of eggs in the first place? Then you’ll definitely want to peep this list of <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/high-protein-foods">26 Foods With More Protein Than an Egg</a>!</p> 26 Things You Need To Know Before Buying A Carton of Eggs

Because brown eggs tend to cost more, people assume they are more nutritious and more delicious. But that is not the case. Brown eggs are more expensive because of their size. Red-feathered chickens tend to weigh more than white-feathered chickens—and the bigger the bird, the bigger the egg! Larger chickens require more food and land to remain healthy throughout production. Higher production costs lead to more expensive products in the end.

Some people also think that one color shell is harder than the other, or that there are different colored yolks. These factors are due to the age and feed of the chickem. The coloring of shells or bird rather has nothing to do with this.

So, the next time you’re in the grocery market don’t be a chicken! Pick as you please — they’re all egg-cellent! And as for how to cook your eggs once you've got them, don't miss our in-depth report, Every Way to Cook Eggs—Ranked for Nutritional Benefits!.

More on MSN: 26 Things You Need To Know Before Buying A Carton of Eggs (Provided by Eat This, Not That!)

26 Things You Need To Know Before Buying A Carton of Eggs: <p>By Olivia Tarantino</p><p>There were some things I expected to be difficult to figure out as an adult—like which funds I should choose for my 401K and what to do when my car breaks down 200 miles from home. Figuring out which carton of eggs to buy was not one of them.</p><p>Everyone has their go-to brands when it comes to supermarket products. For example, I’ll always look for Rao’s when it comes to <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/pasta-sauce">pasta sauce</a> and Bob’s Red Mill for my steel cut oats. But after a few of my first grocery store runs post-college, I started realizing I was clueless when it came to choosing a carton of eggs. You know, those protein-packed pantry staples that are a key component of any health-minded person’s diet?</p><p>I was so clueless, in fact, that I would stand motionless in front of the egg section for minutes at a time, just staring at all the options. I heard “excuse me” more times than I’d like to admit, as hurried shoppers gently nudged me out of their way. They all seemed to have it figured out, but the nutrition junkie inside me couldn’t just grab an option and go. Should I go for the cheaper white eggs? Or were the “cage-free” brown eggs better? And what the heck does “farm fresh” even mean?</p><p>Even if you have your go-to brand, there are some carton claims that we’d bet you might not know the meaning behind. So, if you’re curious to see what exactly omega-3-enriched eggs really are or why brown eggs always cost more (and if they’re better for you), we’ve compiled the ultimate guide to deciphering those eggcellent egg carton claims. Plus, we’ve added a few brands to look out for when you’re shopping! Not a huge fan of eggs in the first place? Then you’ll definitely want to peep this list of <a href="http://www.eatthis.com/high-protein-foods">26 Foods With More Protein Than an Egg</a>!</p> 26 Things You Need To Know Before Buying A Carton of Eggs

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