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A Gallery of Breads - British Bread

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
Photo: Baking day in a 19th-century English village © Provided by DKBooks Baking day in a 19th-century English village

© Provided by DKBooks

Baking day in a 19th-century English village

British Bread

Whatever the shape, the typical British loaf has a soft, tender crumb and a crispy rather than crusty exterior, often liberally dusted with flour. Through the centuries, the unerring preference of the British people has been for loaves made with white wheat flour. Historically, fine white bread graced only the tables of the lords of the manor. There were separate guilds for bakers of white and brown breads, and the saying “to know the color of your bread” meant to know your place in society.


Victorian Milk Bread

Milk is an important ingredient in many British breads. The use of milk in place of water softens both the crumb and the crust. This bread has a velvety texture and a golden smooth exterior. Its fancy scroll shape is typical of the popular Victorian novelty breads. Recipe Victorian Milk Bread

Milk is an important ingredient in many British breads. The use of milk in place of water softens both the crumb and the crust. This bread has a velvety texture and a golden smooth exterior. Its fancy scroll shape is typical of the popular Victorian novelty breads. Recipe Victorian Milk Bread


Bloomer

Half milk and half water are used to make this long, plump loaf, with its crispy crust and light, tender crumb. A typically British shape, this deeply scored loaf dramatically expands, or “blooms,” when baked. Recipe Victorian Milk Bread

Half milk and half water are used to make this long, plump loaf, with its crispy crust and light, tender crumb. A typically British shape, this deeply scored loaf dramatically expands, or “blooms,” when baked. Recipe Victorian Milk Bread


Scots Baps

Baps are soft, flat rolls found all over Great Britain but are mostly associated with Scotland. There they are traditionally eaten at breakfast and called morning rolls or buns. Recipe Scots Baps

Baps are soft, flat rolls found all over Great Britain but are mostly associated with Scotland. There they are traditionally eaten at breakfast and called morning rolls or buns. Recipe Scots Baps


Irish Soda Bread

This everyday Irish bread is traditionally “baked” in a cast-iron pot set over the embers of an open fire. With a cakelike texture, this bread is made without yeast and is best eaten on the day it is baked. Recipe Irish Soda Bread

This everyday Irish bread is traditionally “baked” in a cast-iron pot set over the embers of an open fire. With a cakelike texture, this bread is made without yeast and is best eaten on the day it is baked. Recipe Irish Soda Bread


Cottage Loaf

The most distinctive British shape, the Cottage Loaf, is made by stacking a small round loaf on top of a larger round and joining them by making a deep impression, traditionally formed with the baker’s elbow. Recipe Pain Ordinaire

The most distinctive British shape, the Cottage Loaf, is made by stacking a small round loaf on top of a larger round and joining them by making a deep impression, traditionally formed with the baker’s elbow. Recipe Pain Ordinaire


Granary Pan Loaf

Granary bread is made with a blend of wheat and rye flours mixed with malted grains. It is the most recent addition to the family of British breads; its slightly sweet, nutty taste and moist texture make this loaf a favorite of both children and adults. Recipe Pain Ordinaire

Granary bread is made with a blend of wheat and rye flours mixed with malted grains. It is the most recent addition to the family of British breads; its slightly sweet, nutty taste and moist texture make this loaf a favorite of both children and adults. Recipe Pain Ordinaire

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