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Austria & Eastern Europe - Wine Map of Austria

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
© Provided by DKBooks

Farmhouse overlooking sloping vineyards near Graz, Steiermark

© Provided by DKBooks

Blaufränkisch grapes

Photo: Weingut Bründlmayer, Niederösterreich © Provided by DKBooks Weingut Bründlmayer, Niederösterreich

Weingut Prieler, Burgenland

Photo: Farmhouse overlooking sloping vineyards near Graz, Steiermark © Provided by DKBooks Farmhouse overlooking sloping vineyards near Graz, Steiermark

Photo: Grüner Veltliner grapes © Provided by DKBooks Grüner Veltliner grapes

Grüner Veltliner grapes

Photo: Blaufränkisch grapes © Provided by DKBooks Blaufränkisch grapes

Weingut Bründlmayer, Niederösterreich

Wine Map of Austria

Austria’s vineyards are located in the east of the country along the Czech, Slovakian, Hungarian, and Slovenian borders. The key winegrowing region is Niederösterreich (Lower Austria), on the fertile Donau (Danube) plain in the northeast. The small but significant districts of Wachau and Kremstal, in the west of Niederösterreich, are associated with some of Austria’s most experimental producers.

Austria: Areas & top producers


F X Pichler


Weingut Bründlmayer

Weingut Familie Nigl

Weingut Familie Pitnauer

Weingut Franz Hirtzberger

Weingut Högl

Weingut K Alphart

Weingut Knoll

Weingut Malat

Weingut Prager

Vienna (Wien)

Weingut Wieninger


Josef Pöckl


Weingut Familie Gesellmann

Weingut Gernot & Heike Heinrich

Weingut Juris

Weingut Prieler

Weinlaubenhof Kracher

Steiermark (Styria)


Weingut Erich & Walter Polz

Terroir at a glance




115–650 m.


Varied, from flat lakeside areas around the large shallow Neusiedler See in the east of Burgenland to rolling hills in Steiermark.


Generally stony schist, limestone, and gravel.


Continental, with relatively mild autumns that often allow late ripening into October or November.


July average is 67°F (19.5°C).


Annual average is 603 mm. Rainfall is lowest in the western Weinviertel and highest in the eastern Weinviertel.


Warm Pannonian winds blow along the Donau (Danube) off the Hungarian Plains, resulting in higher temperatures for riverside vineyards.

Viticultural hazards:

Spring frosts, rain.

Top Austrian grape varieties

There are a number of grape varieties that are native to Austria and reflect the country’s special character.

White grape varieties

Grüner Veltliner:

This key variety has a vegetal aroma, and Austrians often talk about the white pepper and grapefruit flavors that emerge when it is very ripe. Top versions come from the Wachau, and many believe it can be a serious rival to Chardonnay and Riesling.


Nothing to do with the well-known Riesling, this grape makes light-bodied, aromatic wines. It always has a seam of lemony acidity, which makes it the favorite choice for making Austria’s sparkling wine, or Sekt.


Traditionally, this is vinified with Rotgipfler, mainly as spicy white Gumpoldskirchner from the Thermenregion. Today, it is often found on its own. Zierfandler is famous for its spiciness.


This grape was the other half of the pairing used for Gumpoldskirchner, but can now be found as a varietal. It sometimes smells of brown bread.


Most often found in the Wachau, this is a cross between Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc) and Silvaner. It tends to be full-bodied, and at its best has a nutty flavor.

Red grape varieties


Widely planted and very popular in Austria, this produces robust, good-colored red wines with a taste of rasp-berries and a sprinkling of white pepper. It is sometimes said to be Austria’s answer to Cabernet Sauvignon, especially in its weightier Burgenland versions, but there is a zip of acidity that always distinguishes it.


Also grown all over Austria, this grape is the creation of Dr. Zweigelt, who crossed St-Laurent and Blaufränkisch. It can be a heavy cropper, but kept under control it makes attractive, juicy, cherry-flavored wines.

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