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Basic Techniques - Rising & Punching Down

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

Rising & Punching Down

The speed of rising depends on certain factors, such as temperature and humidity, as well as on the integral elements of a recipe, such as the type of flour and the method of leavening (that is, with or without a starter). On a warm, humid day, dough should rise more quickly than on a cold, dry one. However, the exact effect of temperature can be difficult to predict. Rising times become more predictable only after years of experience with the same bread recipes. The novice baker might find it difficult to tell when the dough has doubled in size; use the test described in step 3 to help check the progress. If the dough over-rises, see Problem Solving for a remedy.


Rising

Place the kneaded dough in a lightly oiled glass or ceramic bowl large enough to allow the dough to double in size. Metal containers should be avoided since they can conduct heat, causing the dough to rise too quickly. Cover the bowl with a dish towel and let it rise in a cool to normal, draft-free room.

Allow the dough to rise until doubled in size. For most doughs, this will take 1–2 hours. Whole-wheat breads and enriched breads will take longer to rise. The slower a dough rises, the more chance there is for it to develop flavor and texture. Do not allow the dough to over-rise.

To ensure that rising is complete, test the dough by gently pressing with a fingertip. When rising is complete, the indentation made will spring back gradually. If the dough is under-risen, the indentation will spring back at once. If the dough is over-risen, the finger will create a permanent mark that will not spring back at all .


Rising the dough in the refrigerator

This method allows breadmaking to be split into two stages, and is therefore useful for those with busy schedules. Place the dough in a deep glass bowl that will allow it to expand, brush with oil, and cover tightly with plastic wrap. To achieve a complete rise, refrigerate for at least eight hours. After rising, remove from the refrigerator. Leave it at room temperature for two hours before shaping.


Punching down

Once the dough has risen completely, punch down or deflate the dough by pressing down with your knuckles as demonstrated. Turn the dough out of the bowl onto a lightly floured work surface.

Once the dough has risen completely, punch down or deflate the dough by pressing down with your knuckles as demonstrated. Turn the dough out of the bowl onto a lightly floured work surface.


Chafing

Form the dough into a ball by cupping your hands gently around it. Apply a light downward pressure to the sides, while simultaneously rotating the dough continuously in a steady clockwise motion. Continue until the dough is formed into an even round shape. This action is called chafing. Some recipes specify an extended chafing time at this point. Otherwise, allow the dough to rest for 5 minutes and then proceed to the shaping step.

Form the dough into a ball by cupping your hands gently around it. Apply a light downward pressure to the sides, while simultaneously rotating the dough continuously in a steady clockwise motion. Continue until the dough is formed into an even round shape. This action is called chafing. Some recipes specify an extended chafing time at this point. Otherwise, allow the dough to rest for 5 minutes and then proceed to the shaping step.

Cup the dough gently with your hands

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