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Fish and Shellfish - Fish

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
Photo: Mackerel - Often served with gooseberries to cut the richness. This versatile fish can be fried or grilled. Great for quick pâtés, too. © Provided by DKBooks Mackerel - Often served with gooseberries to cut the richness. This versatile fish can be fried or grilled. Great for quick pâtés, too.

Haddock - With its flavorful white flesh, this fish is excellent for making fish and chips.

Photo: Sardine - An oily fish that is cooked whole or in fillets. It is especially good barbecued. © Provided by DKBooks Sardine - An oily fish that is cooked whole or in fillets. It is especially good barbecued.

Sardine - An oily fish that is cooked whole or in fillets. It is especially good barbecued.

Photo: Seabass - Popular in Chinese cookery, this white-fleshed fish can be grilled, baked, or pan-fried. © Provided by DKBooks Seabass - Popular in Chinese cookery, this white-fleshed fish can be grilled, baked, or pan-fried.

Seabass - Popular in Chinese cookery, this white-fleshed fish can be grilled, baked, or pan-fried.

Photo: Lemon Sole - A delicate flat fish that requires quick, gentle cooking to avoid over-cooking. © Provided by DKBooks Lemon Sole - A delicate flat fish that requires quick, gentle cooking to avoid over-cooking.

Tuna - Whole tuna is very large, so it is usually sold cut into steaks. The meaty flesh can be barbecued, grilled, pan-fried, or roasted.

Photo: Turbot - The most expensive flat fish, this has delicate flesh that is excellent pan-fried. © Provided by DKBooks Turbot - The most expensive flat fish, this has delicate flesh that is excellent pan-fried.

Lemon Sole - A delicate flat fish that requires quick, gentle cooking to avoid over-cooking.

Turbot - The most expensive flat fish, this has delicate flesh that is excellent pan-fried.

Salmon - Available farmed and wild, and smoked and plain, salmon is a very versatile oily fish.

Mackerel - Often served with gooseberries to cut the richness. This versatile fish can be fried or grilled. Great for quick pâtés, too.

Fish

There are many ways to cook fresh fish, and straightforward, uncomplicated cooking techniques produce the best results. As an added bonus, fishmongers do all the gutting, filleting, and scaling. So, when you want a healthy meal in a hurry, think fish—we’ve even got inspirational ideas for using the leftovers.


Choosing fish

Freshness is the most important consideration when buying fish. If the fish smells “fishy” or there is any hint of ammonia, don’t buy it. All fish come from one of three basic groups:

Oily round fish have plump, rounded bodies. The dense, rich flesh can be barbecued, grilled, or pan-fried.

White round fish have similar bodies, but the flesh is more tender and flaky, and responds well to all stuffing, frying, grilling, and steaming.

Flat fish are almost 2-dimensional with delicate flesh. They are sold whole or filleted.


Storing

After buying, take fish home immediately, ideally in a cool bag. Loose fish should be rinsed with cold water, patted dry, and then put on a plate with a lip. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the bottom of the refrigerator to prevent any raw juices from dripping on other food. Cook within a day. Packaged fish from the supermarket should be left in the packaging and refrigerated right away. Cook according to the use-by date on the label. Keep all fish refrigerated until just before cooking—never leave at room temperature.


What to look for

The tail should look fresh and moist, not dry or curled

If possible, press the flesh gently to test that it is firm and stiff, not limp or floppy

The eyes should be bright with black pupils and transparent corneas, not sunken or cloudy

The gills should be bright pink or red

The skin of the whole fish should be bright and shiny, with the scales tightly in place

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