You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Meats - Steak

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
Photo: T-bone Steak - Thicker than most steaks, this has a bone left in, which adds extra flavor. Suitable for high-heat quick cooking techniques, and especially good for grilling. Porterhouse is a similar, but thicker, steak. © Provided by DKBooks T-bone Steak - Thicker than most steaks, this has a bone left in, which adds extra flavor. Suitable for high-heat quick cooking techniques, and especially good for grilling. Porterhouse is a similar, but thicker, steak.

Look for thin lines of white intermuscular fat when buying steaks. These are an indication of tenderness.

Photo: Rump Steak - Similar to a sirloin, but slightly less tender, so less expensive. The texture can be variable, and the meat is often lean, so it will often require marinating or tenderizing. © Provided by DKBooks Rump Steak - Similar to a sirloin, but slightly less tender, so less expensive. The texture can be variable, and the meat is often lean, so it will often require marinating or tenderizing.

Rump Steak - Similar to a sirloin, but slightly less tender, so less expensive. The texture can be variable, and the meat is often lean, so it will often require marinating or tenderizing.

Photo: Sirloin Steak - A moderately expensive, boneless steak with a good flavor and tender texture. This steak is suitable for all cooking techniques. © Provided by DKBooks Sirloin Steak - A moderately expensive, boneless steak with a good flavor and tender texture. This steak is suitable for all cooking techniques.

Sirloin Steak - A moderately expensive, boneless steak with a good flavor and tender texture. This steak is suitable for all cooking techniques.

Photo: Minute Steak - Quick pan-frying is the best cooking technique for this very thin, boneless steak. It must be cooked quickly to prevent it from becoming tough, hence its name. © Provided by DKBooks Minute Steak - Quick pan-frying is the best cooking technique for this very thin, boneless steak. It must be cooked quickly to prevent it from becoming tough, hence its name.

Minute Steak - Quick pan-frying is the best cooking technique for this very thin, boneless steak. It must be cooked quickly to prevent it from becoming tough, hence its name.

Photo: Filet Steak - The most tender and expensive steak, good for celebratory meals. This thick, boneless steak can be chargrilled, grilled, or pan-fried. It also can be broiled, but other less expensive steaks are more suitable. © Provided by DKBooks Filet Steak - The most tender and expensive steak, good for celebratory meals. This thick, boneless steak can be chargrilled, grilled, or pan-fried. It also can be broiled, but other less expensive steaks are more suitable.

Filet Steak - The most tender and expensive steak, good for celebratory meals. This thick, boneless steak can be chargrilled, grilled, or pan-fried. It also can be broiled, but other less expensive steaks are more suitable.

Photo: Look for thin lines of white intermuscular fat when buying steaks. These are an indication of tenderness. © Provided by DKBooks Look for thin lines of white intermuscular fat when buying steaks. These are an indication of tenderness.

T-bone Steak - Thicker than most steaks, this has a bone left in, which adds extra flavor. Suitable for high-heat quick cooking techniques, and especially good for grilling. Porterhouse is a similar, but thicker, steak.

Steak

A well-cooked steak is delicious, quick, and easy to cook. Tender, juicy steaks are perfectly suited to the quick-cooking techniques of grilling, chargrilling, broiling, barbecuing, and pan-frying, so with a little practice, a satisfying meal can be on the table no time.


Choosing steak

Supermarkets and butchers sell many types of steak, varying in price and quality. Only buy steaks that look fresh, with a slightly moist appearance. Any fat around the edge should be white or creamy white.

In hot weather, transport steaks home in an insulated bag, and at all times of the year, immediately refrigerate them. Steaks from the supermarket can be left in their tray, but those from the butcher should be taken out of plastic, put on a plate with a lip to avoid dripping, and covered with wax paper. Never buy packaged steaks with torn packaging.

Like all raw meat, steaks should be stored at the bottom of the refrigerator so the raw juices do not cross-contaminate other foods. Cook steaks within 3 days of purchasing, or according to the use-by date.

Chilled steaks should be removed from the refrigerator 15 minutes before cooking to return to room temperature, but no longer than that.


What steak, what dish?

There are many ways to cook steak, other than for simply serving on its own. Steaks are the main ingredients in recipes as diverse as simple sandwiches to impressive main courses, such as Beef Wellington, but not all steak cuts are suitable for all dishes. Be sure to buy the correct cut for every dish to avoid over- or under-cooking and get the best results.

T-bone Steak Thick and meaty, this is best grilled, pan-fried, or broiled.

Rump Steak Can be substituted for sirloin steak in most dishes.

Sirloin Steak A less expensive alternative to fillet steak for stir-fries and salads, it can be cut into chunks for steak pies and casseroles. Also very good for grilling.

Minute Steak Great in sandwiches, pan-fried with eggs for breakfast, and often used in the classic French dish steak frites.

Fillet Steak Good for quick-cooking dishes, such as Beef Stroganoff and stir-fries, as well as beef cooked in pastry and beef salads.


Marbling

The best-quality steaks have thin lines of white fat running through them. This is called marbling.

Marbling adds flavor and helps keep the meat tender. If you are concerned about this small amount of fat, broiling, chargrilling, and grilling are the best cooking techniques to use, as the fat melts away during cooking.

Avoid buying meat with yellow marbling, as this can be an indication the meat is old and might be tough.

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon