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New South Wales - Wine Map of New South Wales

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
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Aerial view of vineyards, Lower Hunter Valley

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McWilliam’s Mount Pleasant Wines

Photo: Water pump surrounded by vineyards, Mudgee © Provided by DKBooks Water pump surrounded by vineyards, Mudgee

Photo: Aerial view of vineyards, Lower Hunter Valley © Provided by DKBooks Aerial view of vineyards, Lower Hunter Valley

Water pump surrounded by vineyards, Mudgee

Wine Map of New South Wales

New South Wales boasts Australia’s number one wine destination: the Hunter Valley. The Lower Hunter produces two world-class varietal wines—ageworthy Sémillon and earthy Shiraz. The Upper Hunter and Mudgee are associated with rich Chardonnay, while the newly emerging Orange and Hilltops areas, farther south, are delivering more minerally examples of Chardonnay, as well as fleshy Shiraz. The larger Riverina area, known for its bulk production, also makes a generous Shiraz, and Sémillon excels here, too. Toward the coast, the emerging Canberra district is delivering floral Rieslings, peppery Shiraz, and excellent Pinot Noir.


New South Wales: Areas & top producers

Upper Hunter Valley

Rosemount Estate


Lower Hunter Valley

Brokenwood Wines

McGuigan Wines

McWilliam’s Mount Pleasant Wines

Poole’s Rock Wines

The Rothbury Estate

Tower Estate

Tyrrell’s


Mudgee

Botobolar Vineyard

Poet’s Corner Wines


Orange & Cowra

Hamiltons Bluff Vineyard


Hilltops

Barwang Vineyard


Canberra District

Clonakilla

Helm Wines

Lark Hill Winery


Riverina

Casella Wines

De Bortoli Wines

Nugan Estate


Perfect case: New South Wales

Terroir at a glance

Latitude:

32–36.5°S.


Altitude:

10–900 m.


Topography:

The Hunter Valley, Canberra, and Mudgee are characterized by undulating hills and flood plains, while Orange, Cowra, Hilltops, and Tumbarumba are mountainous, and vineyards are therefore at higher altitudes. The Murrumbidgee River provides a lifeline in the hot winegrowing region of Riverina.


Soil:

Mostly red clay or sand, with rich volcanic soil in the Orange region.


Climate:

The Lower Hunter is warm and humid; the Upper Hunter is drier. Moderate climate (Mudgee); cool in the foothills of Mount Canobolas (Orange); warm and dry (Cowra). Riverina is hot and dry—irrigation here is vital, whereas Canberra alternates between warm and cool.


Temperature:

January average 81°F (27°C).


Rainfall:

Annual average 630–750 mm.


Viticultural hazards:

Spring frosts; harvest rain; diseases resulting from excessive humidity.

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