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Portugal - Wine Map of Portugal

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
© Provided by DKBooks

Vineyards and the village of Lapela in Vinho Verde

© Provided by DKBooks

Photo: Casks of wine being loaded onto a ship at Funchal port in Madeira © Provided by DKBooks Casks of wine being loaded onto a ship at Funchal port in Madeira

Painted tiles depicting workers gathering grapes in the vineyard

Photo: Vineyards and the village of Lapela in Vinho Verde © Provided by DKBooks Vineyards and the village of Lapela in Vinho Verde

Casks of wine being loaded onto a ship at Funchal port in Madeira

Photo: Painted tiles depicting workers gathering grapes in the vineyard © Provided by DKBooks Painted tiles depicting workers gathering grapes in the vineyard

Wine Map of Portugal

With the exception of the very highest mountain peaks, wine regions virtually cover Portugal. The country is just 125 miles (200 km) east to west at its widest, and 370 miles (600 km) north to south. It also includes the winegrowing island of Madeira, 600 miles (1,000 km) southwest of the mainland. There are 24 DOCs, 5 IPRs, and 8 vinhos regionais. Porto, where port has been made for over two centuries, is Portugal’s most famous DOC.


Portugal: Areas & top producers

Vinho Verde

Quinta da Aveleda


Porto

A A Ferreira

Churchill’s

Cockburn’s

Croft Port

Dow’s Port

Fonseca Porto

Gran Cruz Porto

Niepoort

Quinta do Noval

Ramos Pinto

Sandeman

Taylor’s Port

W & J Graham’s Port

Warre’s Port


Douro

Sogrape


Bairrada

Caves Aliança

Luís Pato


Ribatejo

D F J Vinhos


Setúbal Peninsula

José Maria da Fonseca

J P Vinhos


Alentejo

Herdade do Esporão

Quinta do Carmo


Madeira

Henriques & Henriques

Justino Henriques

Madeira Wine Company

Vinhos Barbeito


Perfect case: Portugal

Terroir at a glance

Latitude:

37–42°N.


Altitude:

0–1,990 m.


Topography:

The Tejo (Tagus) River divides Portugal into two asymmetric halves. The land north of the Tejo is mountainous, rising to nearly 2,000 m in the Serra da Estrela, with a narrow coastal littoral. South of the Tejo the countryside is much flatter, seldom reaching over 500 m.


Soil:

Granite and schist in the interior; limestone, clay, and sand along the coastal littoral.


Climate:

Coastal regions are strongly influenced by the Atlantic, with high rainfall. Inland and to the south, the climate becomes more continental, and near the Spanish border, drought is a continual problem. The marked variation in climate is a major factor in creating many different styles of wine.


Temperature:

July average is 73°F (22.5°C) in Lisboa; 70°F (21.3°C) in the Douro.


Rainfall:

Annual average is 670 mm in Lisboa and 1,130 mm in the Douro.


Wind:

Coastal winds can cause damage. Easterly winds have a drying effect in the summer months.


Viticultural hazards:

Frost; harvest rain; fungal diseases.


Portuguese wine law

Since portugal joined the EU in 1986, a number of new wine regions have been recognized, and Portuguese wine law has gradually been brought in line with other European countries. There are four levels of quality, and grape varieties, maximum yields, and (in some instances) minimum aging requirements are controlled at both DOC and IPR levels.


Denominação de Origem Controlada (DOC)

Equivalent to AOC in France, DOC is the highest category of wine in Portugal. Wines must originate from a designated area and be produced according to local regulations.


Indicação de Proveniencia Regulamentada (IPR)

A category for wines with the potential to achieve DOC status.


Vinho regional

Regional wines, produced from a broad but legally defined area. Equivalent to vin de pays in France, this category permits the blending of wines across a wide area and is much more flexible in the range of grape varieties allowed. In the south, many producers prefer to use this category.


Vinho de mesa

Table wine.

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