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Spain - Wine Map of Central & Southern Spain

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
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Harvesting grapes, Andalucía

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Vines in albariza soil, Jerez, Andalucía

Photo: Vineyards on La Mancha plain, Castilla-La Mancha © Provided by DKBooks Vineyards on La Mancha plain, Castilla-La Mancha

Photo: Vines in albariza soil, Jerez, Andalucía © Provided by DKBooks Vines in albariza soil, Jerez, Andalucía

Photo: Harvesting grapes, Andalucía © Provided by DKBooks Harvesting grapes, Andalucía

Vineyards on La Mancha plain, Castilla-La Mancha

Photo: Piqueras rosé © Provided by DKBooks Piqueras rosé

Piqueras rosé

Wine Map of Central & Southern Spain

This is a vast area encompassing five autonomous regions, which break down into 32 DOs, including the two Pagos (single estates). Some DOs are only of local interest; others, such as Jumilla and Yecla, boast a few star producers; and a couple, most notably La Mancha and Valencia, are making waves in the outside world, especially in terms of value-for-money wines. Of most significance is the Jerez DO, producing sherry, Spain’s oldest and (now) second-best-selling wine.


Central Spain: Areas & top producers

Castilla-La Mancha

Dehesa del Carrizal

Dominio de Valdepusa

Félix Solís

Finca Élez

J A Megía Hijos

Nuestro Padre Jesús del Perdón

Piqueras

Vinícola de Castilla


Valencia & Murcia

Agapito Rico

Enrique Mendoza

Mustiguillo


Southern Spain: Areas & top producers

Andalucía

Alvear

Emilio Lustau

González Byass

Hidalgo-La Gitana

Perez Barquero

Príncipe Alfonso


Perfect case: Central & Southern Spain

Terroir at a glance

Latitude:

36–40.5°N (Mainland); 28°N (Canarias).


Altitude:

0–3,480 m.


Topography:

Central Spain is a vast meseta (plateau), dominated by Madrid at an altitude of 650 m. The meseta climbs toward the mountainous area of Andalucía in the south. From there, land falls in a series of plateaus toward sea level. The Canarias (Canary Islands), volcanic in origin, have some of the highest vineyards in the world (over 1,500 m).


Soil:

Sandy clay throughout, with rich limestone in places.


Climate:

Harsh, with huge temperature ranges. Andalucía is hot-Mediterranean, (although the highlands are much wetter than the lowlands) and the Canarias are subtropical.


Temperature:

Annual July average is 91°F (33°C) in Córdoba on the mainland and 82°F (28°C) in the Canarias.


Rainfall:

Annual average is 625 mm in Córdoba on the mainland and 200 mm in the Canarias.


Viticultural hazards:

Summer drought.

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