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Steak - Cooking Steak

DK PublishingDK Publishing 2/07/2014 DKBooks
© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

© Provided by DKBooks

Cooking Steak

Pan-fry

Heat a heavy frying pan over high heat until very hot, but not smoking. Brush the pan with a very thin layer of vegetable oil, put the steak in the pan, and fry for half the time specified below, or in a specific recipe.

Using tongs, turn the steak over and fry for the remaining time. Use the finger test ( shown here) to determine when the steak is cooked as desired. Remove the steak from the pan, cover with foil, and let rest for 5 minutes before serving.


Grill

Light the grill well in advance so the coals are glowing and ash gray. When ready to cook, brush the steak with vegetable oil, and place it on the rack. Follow the timings below, or in a specific recipe, and use tongs to turn the steak over halfway through the cooking time.


Pan-grill

Heat a ridged cast-iron grill pan until it is very hot, but not smoking. Brush the steak with oil before putting it in the pan. Follow the timings below, or in a specific recipe, and use tongs to turn the steak over halfway through the cooking time.


Cooking steaks to perfection

The timings below are for barbecuing, grilling, or broiling sirloin, rump, and T-bone steaks 1 1/2in (4cm) thick. Timings will vary depending on the type of pan, the exact degree of heat, and the quality and thickness of the meat. Turn the meat after half the specified cooking time.


Very rare

Cook until just seared on both sides. The steak feels very soft when pressed, and the interior is reddish purple.


Rare

When drops of blood come to the surface, turn the steak over. It feels soft and spongy, and the interior is red.


Medium

Turn the steak when drops of juice are first visible. The steak offers resistance when pressed and is pink in the center.


Well done

Turn the steak when drops of juice are clearly visible. Thesteak feels firm and is uniformly brown throughout.


Testing for doneness

Take a tip from chefs and use this simple touch test to determine how a steak is cooked. Press the steak to determine how much resistance it has. A very rare steak will feel like the heel of your thumb on a relaxed hand. As you press the tip of your thumb to the tips of your fingers, the heel of your thumb becomes firmer. A rare steak feels like the heel of your thumb when you press your thumb and index finger together; for medium ( shown here), press your thumb and middle finger together; for well done, press your thumb and little finger together.

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