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'Death Wish' coffee recalled because it can kill you

USA TODAY logo USA TODAY 4/10/2017 Sean Rossman

The maker of a nitro cold brew coffee with "Death Wish" in the name is removing the cans out of fear of botulism. © Getty Images The maker of a nitro cold brew coffee with "Death Wish" in the name is removing the cans out of fear of botulism. Federal regulators are pulling a type of coffee with the words "Death Wish" in the name because it can cause botulism, which can kill you.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the recall of 11-ounce cans of Death Wish Nitro Cold Brew coffee. The maker of the product, Death Wish Coffee Company, determined the "current process" for the coffee could foster the growth of botulin, a deadly toxin tied to botulism.

The FDA reports no one has reported a sickness related to the cold brew.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) describe botulism as a rare illness caused by toxins attacking the body's nerves. It can lead to breathing problems, paralysis and death. Slurred speech, drooping eyelids, double vision, dry mouth and muscle weakness are among botulism's symptoms. Those experiencing such symptoms should see a doctor.

The New York-based company, which boasts "The World's Strongest Coffee" on its website, initiated the recall. It has since stopped making the nitro cold brew, "until an additional step in the manufacturing process is made," the CDC said. The company has also pulled the coffee cans from store shelves and removed the product from its website. People with the coffee should throw it away or return it for a refund. 

Death Wish founder and owner Mike Brown apologized for the incident.

"Our customers' safety is of paramount importance and Death Wish Coffee is taking this significant, proactive step to ensure that the highest quality, safest, and of course, strongest Coffee products we produce are of industry-exceeding standards," he said

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