You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Architect couple transform tiny east London flat the size of four parking spaces into spacious two bedroom home with its own office (though it helps to be 'ridiculously tidy')

Daily Mail logo Daily Mail 9/10/2018 Amie Gordon For Mailonline

a woman standing in a room: Sara L'Esperance, 29, and Michael Putman, 42, in the tiny space which they have transformed into a bright and modern flat  © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Sara L'Esperance, 29, and Michael Putman, 42, in the tiny space which they have transformed into a bright and modern flat  A couple have transformed a tiny baking room in a former biscuit factory into a modern two bedroom home complete with a walk-in wardrobe and office.  

The property in Bethnal Green, in London's East End, has been completely overhauled by architects Sara L'Esperance, 29, and Michael Putman, 42. 

Using innovative 'pods', the pair transformed the 60 square metre property to create a modern home boasting two bedrooms and a guest bed alongside a kitchen, bathroom, office and living room as well as nine sqm of storage.

The property, which the pair bought for £485,000 in 2016, is now estimated to be worth around £695,000.

a view of a room: Using minimal materials and operating on a small budget the pair have completely overhauled the space which was once used as a baking room  © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Using minimal materials and operating on a small budget the pair have completely overhauled the space which was once used as a baking room 

Together, the couple make up the artistic studio SUPRBLK which has now been commissioned to take on another project in Camden in light of their work at the Biscuit Factory. 

The couple, who confess they are both 'ridiculously tidy', lived in the space for a year in a bid to work out how they might renovate it.

a group of people in a room: The couple used cheap materials to create the pods which separate the lounge, kitchen, bedrooms and office  © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The couple used cheap materials to create the pods which separate the lounge, kitchen, bedrooms and office  The building was once the home of the Kearley & Tonge, a tea-importing firm founded in 1876 by Hudson Ewbanke Kearley, 1st Viscount Devonport. 

He expanded his company to make it a wholesale grocery business in the 1800s and took on the six-storey building in east London, turning it into a factory producing jams, cakes, biscuits and sweets. 

In the 80s the building was converted into flats. 

Ms L'Esperance, who specialises in 'leftover spaces found in urban environments', told Homes and Country she was drawn to the trendy neighbourhood for its 'artisanal coffee shops' before finding the property and giving it a new lease of life.

The flat comprises two bedrooms and a separate guest bed, making it ideal for a couple and young working professionals  © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited The flat comprises two bedrooms and a separate guest bed, making it ideal for a couple and young working professionals  a bicycle leaning against a wall: Ideal for City workers, storage space has been created around the flat - with wall mounts for bicycles  © Provided by Associated Newspapers Limited Ideal for City workers, storage space has been created around the flat - with wall mounts for bicycles 

The pair told Homes and Property they are 'ridiculously tidy', so created as much storage space as possible - even hiding the kitchen light switch beneath the office floor.  

Using Birch plywood, they created 'pods' to divide the space into spacious living quarters with an integrated kitchen and living area.  

Making use of the 3.5 metre-high ceilings, they built the kitchen with an office space above and a bedroom behind. 

The flat boasts a home cinema, with the front door used as a backdrop for the projector fitted to the wall.

Related gallery:  Tiny homes you'll absolutely love [Love Money] 

The pair stripped back the boards which had been put in place in the late 1980s to reveal the brickwork behind, using it to create a light and airy modern feel.  

A two-bedroom flat in the building costs upwards of £450,000, according to Homes and Property.  

More From Daily Mail

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon