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Would you give your baby a tag to ward off strangers?

Newshub logoNewshub 10/10/2018 Newshub staff

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Every parent knows your own bundle of joy is the most perfect being ever to grace the planet.

Cute little hands, cheeks and feet - basically no one is immune to little bub's charm.  

So it's little wonder that strangers want to give the little cutie a cuddle - but if you weren't too keen on the cooties they may keep what if you were to label your baby 'off limits'? 

One mum, Johanna Ackerman, has done exactly that; to keep "baby squeezers" at arm's length, she's come up with signs which can be attached to prams and car seats.

"After my nephew was born with a couple of holes in his heart, and my sister in law was nervous about taking him out, he couldn't get sick otherwise it could be really dangerous for him," she says.

"My son a couple of years ago was born around 29 weeks, after we took him home from hospital after watching him struggle to breathe, we were nervous about taking him out."

Parents of babies around the world have been snapping the signs up but would Kiwi parents ever hang a sign like this on their snot-covered rays of sunshine?

Child development expert Nathan Wallis says people approaching babies without permission is similar to men approaching women they don't know in the street - not cool.

He says you have to build a relationship with that baby, introduce yourself and get to know the baby so you aren't a stranger any more - much like when a man gets to know a woman. 

© Image - Instagram ; Video - The Project And if parent choose to make their baby 'off limits', it's their choice, he says. 

"It's their baby, who are we to tell them what to do with their baby?" Mr Wallis said.

"I've sort of got a two-prong thing about it really - if they're worried about germs, maybe they should have the opposite? Being exposed to germs builds up your immune system, but this New Zealand practice of swooping on the baby whenever we want to probably needs to change.

"So in that perspective, good on them."


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