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Hampton Court Palace is said to be haunted by Henry VIII's wives. Here are 5 eerie stories about the former royal home.

INSIDER Logo By emcdowell@businessinsider.com (Erin McDowell) of INSIDER | Slide 2 of 7: In the early 16th century, the palace was expanded and renovated to be fit for a king, complete with lush gardens, banquet halls, and Henry VIII's state and private apartments. The palace has over 1,390 rooms and is located in East Molesey, Surrey, about an hour outside of London.Many royals occupied Hampton Court Palace over the years, from Henry VIII to William III and Mary II, George I, and finally George II. George II was the last monarch to use the palace as a royal residence.Beginning in 1737, Hampton Court became a site for "grace and favor residents," according to Historic Royal Palaces. These residents were mostly aristocrats and their wives who were in need of free accommodation in return for servicing the king. People were granted apartments at Hampton Court up until the 1960s, and elderly residents still reside in some apartments today.In 1838, Queen Victoria opened the property to visitors. This paved the way for what Hampton Court Palace is today: a destination for visitors and tourists from all over the world who come to marvel at its architecture, impressive art collection, and undeniably eerie past.

Hampton Court Palace was built by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey in 1514. In 1528, the property was acquired by King Henry VIII, who lived there over the years with his six wives.

In the early 16th century, the palace was expanded and renovated to be fit for a king, complete with lush gardens, banquet halls, and Henry VIII's state and private apartments. The palace has over 1,390 rooms and is located in East Molesey, Surrey, about an hour outside of London.

Many royals occupied Hampton Court Palace over the years, from Henry VIII to William III and Mary II, George I, and finally George II. George II was the last monarch to use the palace as a royal residence.

Beginning in 1737, Hampton Court became a site for "grace and favor residents," according to Historic Royal Palaces. These residents were mostly aristocrats and their wives who were in need of free accommodation in return for servicing the king. People were granted apartments at Hampton Court up until the 1960s, and elderly residents still reside in some apartments today.

In 1838, Queen Victoria opened the property to visitors. This paved the way for what Hampton Court Palace is today: a destination for visitors and tourists from all over the world who come to marvel at its architecture, impressive art collection, and undeniably eerie past.

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