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Top 10 most common occupations for workers with a business degree

Stacker Logo By Leesa Davis of Stacker | Slide 1 of 11: A bachelor’s degree in business can prepare you for a variety of jobs in just about any industry. Whether working for a nonprofit, a financial firm, or a wholesale manufacturer, people who hold a business degree can put their skills to the test. According to a 2019 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, 25% of business degree holders fall into the occupational group “management occupations,” and 22% fall under “business and financial operations occupations.” Santa Clara University compiled 2020 data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to identify the most common occupations among business degree holders, including those requiring a master’s degree or a law degree. In order to obtain a business degree, first consider what your interests are as well as your skills and strengths. Are you highly organized and enjoy meeting and speaking with new people? Do you know your way around numbers, spreadsheets, and data analysis? Or are you a pro at looking at the big picture of a company’s operations and inefficiencies? Business majors complete coursework across a broad range of disciplines, including negotiation, sales and marketing, operational management, financial and quantitative analysis, and data research. You can also often get a degree or certificate in a specialized area within business, such as human resources or entrepreneurship. Some people have degrees in other industries and wish to pivot to the business sector. 

Top 10 most common occupations for workers with a business degree

A bachelor’s degree in business can prepare you for a variety of jobs in just about any industry. Whether working for a nonprofit, a financial firm, or a wholesale manufacturer, people who hold a business degree can put their skills to the test.

According to a 2019 Bureau of Labor Statistics report, 25% of business degree holders fall into the occupational group “management occupations,” and 22% fall under “business and financial operations occupations.” Santa Clara University compiled 2020 data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to identify the most common occupations among business degree holders, including those requiring a master’s degree or a law degree.

In order to obtain a business degree, first consider what your interests are as well as your skills and strengths. Are you highly organized and enjoy meeting and speaking with new people? Do you know your way around numbers, spreadsheets, and data analysis? Or are you a pro at looking at the big picture of a company’s operations and inefficiencies? Business majors complete coursework across a broad range of disciplines, including negotiation, sales and marketing, operational management, financial and quantitative analysis, and data research.

You can also often get a degree or certificate in a specialized area within business, such as human resources or entrepreneurship. Some people have degrees in other industries and wish to pivot to the business sector. 

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