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New Zealand man accidentally kidnaps and drugs neighbour's cat

The Telegraph logo The Telegraph 12/10/2017 Mark Molloy

A New Zealand man accidentally kidnapped and drugged his neighbour’s cat after confusing it with his own black feline. © @NZClarke/Twitter A New Zealand man accidentally kidnapped and drugged his neighbour’s cat after confusing it with his own black feline. A New Zealand man accidentally kidnapped and drugged his neighbour’s cat after confusing it with his own black feline.

TV presenter Clarke Gayford tweeted about how his friend mistakenly took the wrong pet to the vet in a case of mistaken identity.

“A mate spent $130NZ (£69) at (the) vet on his cat then had to lock it in his bedroom for five days recovery, and just now his actual cat walked in!” he wrote.

“He just told me a neighbour had come looking for her missing black cat and he said 'Na, sorry, just my cat in here!'”

The TV star explained that the vet somehow failed to spot the mix-up, despite the felines being opposite sexes.

The unusual episode then took another bizarre turn when the cat owner began giving the wrong pet some medicine.

“OMG so he told vet it did seem to be acting strange so vet prescribed it anti-anxiety meds. My mate has kidnapped and been drugging a kitten!”

The cat was eventually returned to its rightful owner, who later sent a text explaining the pet didn’t “seem to have been traumatised by his confinement”.

“I’ll keep him inside until after work tomorrow, but I think it doesn’t matter that much. So far he has spent most of his time on my lap with an interlude of playing. So, really he’s fine,” they added.



Gayford quipped in response: “Well of course your cat is chilled out, my mate has been feeding your cat drugs!”

The bizarre tale has been shared by thousands on Twitter, with one responding: “No wonder the kidnapped cat had anxiety.”

In other kitty news, is your cat really trying to work out how to kill you? Research suggests they could well be plotting your downfall.

Why do cats love chilling out in boxes so much? Scientists believe they have the answer .

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