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10 Instant Ways to Fight Employee Burnout

The Huffington Post The Huffington Post 23/02/2016 Young Entrepreneur Council

Your team is usually self-motivated, but all of a sudden, they're taking much longer on ordinary tasks. There's a good chance they're suffering from burnout, and it's bound to happen in the startup world. Here are some immediate fixes to get everyone back in the swing of things.

A. Switch It Up

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When my employees are either taking too long on a task that they have completed rapidly before or seem irritated by a certain one, I redo their priorities or assign a few to another employee so they don't feel overwhelmed. I also try to get another employee to assist, or I suggest they change their work schedule. Often, these changes can help get someone back on track and over the proverbial hump. - Luigi Wewege, Vivier Group

A. Create a Tailored Solution

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Everyone gets burned out here and there. As a leader you need to ask, listen and then create a solution. There is not one single reason people get burned out. We are all individuals with unique tasks, thoughts, problems, etc. Ask and listen to people. Then come up with the best solution you can both agree on and put it into action! - Jeff Cayley, Worldwide Cyclery

A. Encourage Transparency and Vulnerability

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Burnout is inevitable, especially in a startup environment. As a CEO, it's important to watch for signs of burnout among your executives and to teach them how to look for signs on their teams. Transparency and vulnerability are key to getting employees back on track after a burnout. We listen carefully, and when necessary, take action. Sometimes, that action is a short break, other times it's a change. - Simon Berg, Ceros

A. Go to Sleep

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Tell them to stop working, go home, take a vacation, breath, or get a good night's sleep. A well-rested mind and soul are the best solution to burnout so that they can get back on track. - Fenella Kim, Reliance Star Payment Services

A. Get Them Grounded

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It's different for every person, but find a way to get them grounded and back on track. I've found regular meditation, yoga and massages to work wonders. - David Henzel, MaxCDN

A. Shuffle Your Clients Around

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When one of our team members feel they are worn out working with the same clients, we shuffle the clients to give all sides an objective and fresh set of eyes. This does wonders, especially in our content writing room at Ranky. - Yoav Vilner, Ranky

A. Offer More Flexibility

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Burnout is often more related to the struggle to balance all of life and work responsibilities that seem to increase over time. By providing employees with more flexible working arrangements, they may feel relieved and more relaxed, knowing that they can strike a balance and more effectively take care of all their responsibilities. In return, they are more likely to feel and act productively. - Angela Ruth,

A. Get an Executive Coach

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Executive coaches can help with more than just management problems. In our case, my co-founder and I started working with a coach who happens to have 30 years of experience as a psychologist as well. He did a great job at listening and providing a custom approach that also works within the context of the business and your business needs. It was one of the best things we ever did. - Mattan Griffel, One Month

A. Offer New Challenges

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Offering new challenges in the form of projects or positions might help an employee work through burnout, as burnout typically has to do with the fact that what they were doing is no longer interesting or hold any real challenge for them. In providing these new challenges, you will want to include the training or education to set them up for the new work. - Zach Binder, Ranklab

A. Ditch the Monotony

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I like to check in with my employees and make sure they are happy. To keep it fresh and fun in the office, we're always doing contests, having ping pong tournaments, potlucks, ugly sweater contests -- anything to help make the environment fun and keep the day-to-day exciting. - Jayna Cooke, EVENTup

These answers are provided by the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC), an invite-only organization comprised of the world's most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, YEC recently launched BusinessCollective, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses.

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