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3 Ways You're Killing Your Potential Client's Interest in Your Product and How to Regain It

The Huffington Post The Huffington Post 15/03/2016 Vicky Law
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You've created your product, so now it's time to put it out there and make money, right?
Yeah, that would work, so long as you can keep your audience's interest alive. For some that only works the other way round -- they unconsciously kill their audience's interest. That can get really messy when they keep pushing so hard, especially when they think that will make it all work out in the end.

Are you guilty of killing your potential client's interest? Here 3 ways to find out.
1. You focus too much on sales
Focusing too much on sales like strangling your potential client with your bare hands until they can barely breathe.
How would you feel like if some random person comes to you and tries to sell you one of their products?
Eeeek! Go away! Who are you?
My thoughts exactly. If you don't like it when someone randomly starts selling things to you, then what gives you the impression that once you tell people about your product they'd buy it?
No one likes being sold to. Period. It's annoying!
When you tell people about what you're selling, they get intimated. They freak out. Even if the product you want to sell will be the best thing that will ever happen in their lives if they buy it, they would not want to hear anything about it. This is because their first impression of you is of that of the "annoying salesman".
If you want to make sales then you need to start off on the right foot. You need to start from the position of giving value.
Begin by giving great tips and tricks that they can apply. Tell them about the tools they can use to make their lives easier. Share the mistakes you made and the lessons you learnt in your journey. Make sure the things you give are related to what your product is about. For example, if you are selling a course on branding for creatives, make sure that the information you give out for free relates to branding.
When you give value consistently, people start to trust you. They start to see you as someone who is an expert in your field. When you give them value, they are drawn to you. You make them want more information. You've got them hooked. At that point, you can tell them that if they'd like more information they can learn more from your product.
2. You don't build relationships
Trying to sell without building relationships is like running your potential client over with an SUV.
Who you would feel more comfortable buying from: someone who is familiar to you who you can trust or some stranger you've never known before?
That's a no brainer! The person who is more familiar, of course!
Glad you said that. If you prefer to buy from someone who is more familiar then what makes you think that someone who does not know you, even a little bit, would want to buy from you?
Building relationships with your target audience is so important. Yes, they may be drawn to you because of the immense value you give them but you need to also get close to your audience and get to know them better. Form a bond with your audience. Make friends with them.
When you build relationships, you show yourself as someone who is approachable. People will not only be drawn to you but will also be committed to you. Having people buy your product is good but having those same people come back every time to have something up for sale is even better. That is what makes business sweet.
3. You don't give what your audience wants
Not giving what your audience wants but forcing them to buy what you think they need is like ramming a spoon down your potential client's throats.
Ever created a product and all you got was crickets?
Yeah, we all have those days. Don't worry, it can be avoided.
You may have worked for hours trying to create that EPIC product. The fact that no one buys your product does not mean that your product is crappy or not useful. It just means that your product is not what your audience wants.
But this is what my audience needs!
Here's a newsflash: people don't buy what they need. They buy want they want.
Needs are things that are a requirement. Wants are things that you desire and wish for. What you need is not necessarily what you want. What you want is not always what you need. For example, you WANT to have a 6-figure income but you NEED to work hard in order to make that kind of money. No one wants to put in the work. I mean it's so hard! You'd definitely choose having that money given to you for free on a silver platter than working your ass off any day.
In order to get sales you have to create a product that is centered on what your audience WANTS. Your audience are MORE prone to buying what they want. That is what they go for.
For you to know what your audience wants you have to find out where it itched them the most so that you can go there and give them a good scratch. Okay, maybe that was a bit too graphic. But you get the idea.
Get to know your audience. Listen to them. Find out their problems, their pain points and their struggles. Find out what they are looking for and what they are asking from your competition that your competition is not giving. Once you've got all those facts then create products that will give them what they want.
So there you have it!
If you want your potential client to buy your product make sure you don't strangle them, run them over with your SUV or ram a spoon down their throats. It can get messy.

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