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Bach says he's open to unified Koreas team for Pyeongchang

Associated Press logo Associated Press 30/06/2017 By JOHN DUERDEN, Associated Press
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump welcome South Korean President Moon Jae-in and his wife Kim Jung-sook on the South Portico at the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta) © The Associated Press President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump welcome South Korean President Moon Jae-in and his wife Kim Jung-sook on the South Portico at the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

SEOUL, South Korea — IOC President Thomas Bach said Friday that he is open to the possibility of a unified Korean team at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea in February.

Speaking in Muju, 240 kilometers (150 miles) south of Seoul, on the final day of the 2017 World Taekwondo Championships, Bach told a media conference that he would discuss the issue with South Korea President Moon Jae-in.

At the opening ceremony of the championships, Moon, currently in the United States to visit U.S. President Donald Trump, raised the possibility of the two countries participating together.

"We have noted with great appreciation the message of President Moon to see the Olympic games as a possibility for dialogue and reconciliation," said Bach, adding that Moon's comments reflected the Olympic spirit.

"What this could mean for the 2018 Winter Games and what could be done in respect, we'll discuss this Monday with President Moon once he's back from his state visit to the U.S."

Bach, a former Olympic fencer, confirmed that regardless of any joint team, the IOC was ready to assist North Korea's involvement at Pyeongchang.

"The position of the IOC is very clear," he said. "We have already invited the DPRK (North Korea) to participate in the Winter Games in 2018. We are supporting athletes in order to assist them to qualify for the Olympic games."

Earlier this week, however, North Korea's sole member of the IOC, Chang Ung, was cautious when talking to South Korean media.

"It's only hypothetical, and many different departments at the IOC are involved," said Chang. "We should stop this discussion. We should only talk about what's practically possible. I think it's going to be very difficult."

While the two Koreas, technically still at war since an armistice brought hostilities to an end in 1953, have marched together at the opening ceremonies at various Olympic tournaments in the past, they have never sent a unified team to compete on that stage.

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