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Berlin police seek info on tools used for museum gold heist

Associated Press logo Associated Press 31/03/2017
FILE - The Dec. 12, 2010 file photo shows the gold coin 'Big Maple Leaf' in the Bode Museum in Berlin. The 100-kilogram (220 pound) gold coin disappeared from the museum. Berlin police have published pictures of the tools used to steal a 100-kilogram (221-pound) gold coin stolen from a city museum as they scramble to track down the thieves Friday March 31, 2017. Officials have said that at least two burglars broke into the Bode Museum early Monday, using a ladder to climb to a window from elevated railway tracks. They grabbed the “Big Maple Leaf” coin, worth some $4.5 million and loaded it onto a wheelbarrow. (Marcel Mettelsiefen/dpa via AP) © The Associated Press FILE - The Dec. 12, 2010 file photo shows the gold coin 'Big Maple Leaf' in the Bode Museum in Berlin. The 100-kilogram (220 pound) gold coin disappeared from the museum. Berlin police have published pictures of the tools used to steal a 100-kilogram (221-pound) gold coin stolen from a city museum as they scramble to track down the thieves Friday March 31, 2017. Officials have said that at least two burglars broke into the Bode Museum early Monday, using a ladder to climb to a window from elevated railway tracks. They grabbed the “Big Maple Leaf” coin, worth some $4.5 million and loaded it onto a wheelbarrow. (Marcel Mettelsiefen/dpa via AP)

BERLIN — Berlin police have published pictures of the tools used to steal a 100-kilogram (221-pound) gold coin stolen from a city museum as they scramble to track down the thieves.

Officials say at least two burglars broke into the Bode Museum early Monday, using a ladder to climb to a window from elevated railway tracks. They grabbed the "Big Maple Leaf" coin, worth some $4.5 million, and loaded it onto a wheelbarrow.

Police on Friday posted online pictures of the new-looking wheelbarrow, the ladder, an ax handle and other objects left behind after the theft. They asked for information from anyone who saw those tools before the theft or saw someone buying them.

Authorities believe the three-centimeter (1.2-inch) thick coin was likely damaged in the theft.

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