You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

'Cards Against Humanity' re-opens STEM scholarship for women

Engadget Engadget 19/09/2016 Andrew Dalton
© Provided by Engadget

Last year, the wildly popular potty-mouthed card game Cards Against Humanity channeled the profits from its $10 Science Pack into a full-ride college scholarship for women studying science, technology, engineering or math. With Science Pack sales still going strong, and gender equality in STEM fields still sorely lacking, Cards is ready to accept another round of applications for the scholarship's second year.

Like last year, the scholarship offers full, four-year tuition to any woman seeking an undergraduate degree in any STEM field and applications will be reviewed by a board of over 60 women working in places like NASA JPL, Harvard Medical School and the National Science Foundation. Ideal candidates will be "an ambassador for their field" and are asked to submit a three-minute video lecture on a science topic they are passionate about. Applicants must be enrolled or planning to attend college in United States during the 2017 academic year, but any STEM field is fair game. (Sorry, no graduate students, however.) The deadline for submissions is December 11th at midnight and ten finalists will be asked to submit additional materials.

"I'm so excited that we're able to offer another scholarship for a woman studying STEM. A lot of us at Cards Against Humanity have backgrounds in science and tech, and the underrepresentation of women in these fields is staggering," Cards Against Humanity's community director Jenn Bane said in a statement.

To date, the scholarship has raised over $975,000 on the profits of that aforementioned Science Pack. More details about the application process can be found at the Science Ambassador Scholarship website, and for prospective applicants who need a little inspiration, here's last year's winning submission from Sona Dadhania, who studies Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania:

Science Ambassador Scholarship

More from Engadget

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon