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Christopher Lee makes metal Quixote

BBC News BBC News 27/05/2014 BBC News
Christopher Lee: Lee is currently starring as Saruman in the Hobbit film trilogy © Getty Images Lee is currently starring as Saruman in the Hobbit film trilogy Christopher Lee: Lee is currently starring as Saruman in the Hobbit film trilogy © Getty Images Lee is currently starring as Saruman in the Hobbit film trilogy

Actor Sir Christopher Lee is marking his 92nd birthday by releasing an album of heavy metal cover versions.

Two of the songs come from the Don Quixote musical Man of La Mancha, which was a Broadway smash in the 1960s.

"As far as I am concerned, Don Quixote is the most metal fictional character that I know," the Hobbit star said.

"Single handed, he is trying to change the world, regardless of any personal consequences. It is a wonderful character to sing."

The album also includes an ear-splitting version of Frank Sinatra's My Way - originally written by Paul Anka - which Lee originally released in 2006.

"My Way is a very remarkable song," said the star in a YouTube preview.

"It is also difficult to sing because you've got to convince people that what you're singing about is the truth."

Sir Christopher launched his singing career in the 1990s, with an album of Broadway tunes, including I Stole The Prince from Gilbert and Sullivan's The Gondoliers, and Epiphany from Sweeney Todd.

In 2010, his album Charlemagne: By the Sword and the Cross, which told the story of the first Holy Roman Emperor won a Spirit of Metal Award from Metal Hammer magazine.

His latest release, Metal Knight, is a collaboration with Italian symphonic metal band, Rhapsody Of Fire.

"I associate heavy metal with fantasy because of the tremendous power that the music delivers," he has said.

The actor is known for his numerous appearances as Dracula, as well as playing Scaramanga in The Man With The Golden Gun, Saruman in Lord Of The Rings, and Count Dooku in the Star Wars prequels.

Last year, he was presented with a fellowship from the British Film Institute.

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