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Fujifilm's X-T2 camera pairs a familiar design with 4K video

Engadget Engadget 7/07/2016 Edgar Alvarez
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Based on recent conversations with Fujifilm camera users, I know many of them couldn't wait for the X-T1 successor to be announced. And well, that day is finally here. Today, Fujifilm introduced its new X-T2 mirrorless shooter, a major upgrade over the X-T1 from 2014. The X-T2 features a 24.3-megapixel (APS-C) X-Trans CMOS III sensor without a low-pass filter, which should help capture sharp, DSLR-like images. Additionally, there's an X-Processor Pro chip that, according to Fujifilm, uses improved algorithms to produce a more accurate autofocus system (325 single points, 91 zone).

What's more, in a first for the X Series line of digital cameras, Fujifilm's X-T2 can shoot 4K video at 24, 25 and 30 fps. That's something fans of the brand had been asking for, but we'll see whether the UHD quality (3,840 x 2,160) meets people's expectations. For now, we do know recording in 4K is limited to up to 10 minutes at a time, though this could change later with a firmware update. That said, you also have the option to shoot for longer periods in 1080p (15 minutes) or 720p (30 minutes) at 24, 25, 30, 50 and 60 fps.

Like its predecessor, the X-T2 comes with a weather-resistant design, as well as an OLED electronic viewfinder, a 3-inch tilting LCD screen and WiFi for remote control and sharing pictures to mobile devices. The X-T2's continuous shooting mode is a decent 8 fps, while the ISO range clocks in at 100-21,600 (52,000 with the High setting). And don't forget you have Fujifilm's trademark physical dials at your disposal. All told, the X-T2 is a solid alternative to the X-Pro 2 -- at least on paper.

The X-T2 won't be cheap when it arrives in September. You'll need to pay $1,600 just for the body, or $1,900 for a kit that includes an XF 18-55mm lens. Stay tuned, as we'll have hands-on pictures and impressions of the camera in a few hours.

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