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Meet the newest AngelPad startups, and the tech they built to cure business headaches

TechCrunch TechCrunch 8/06/2016 Lora Kolodny

Yesterday in San Francisco, AngelPad held its 10th Demo Day, a graduation of sorts for the enterprise startups admitted into and backed by the accelerator.

The accelerator, run by husband and wife team Thomas Korte and Carine Magescas, has realized at least one solid exit already in the adtech startup MoPub, which sold to Twitter for $350 million in stock in the fall of 2013.

Companies that have raised significant rounds of venture funding after completing the AngelPad bootcamp include: Postmates, the delivery service; Apteligent (formerly known as Crittercism) which provides app analytics, including crash reports, to developers and brands; and Vungle which lets app makers put videos ads in their apps to monetize them, among many others.

Although AngelPad is known for funding some notable marketing and adtech startups, companies in its latest batch ranged widely, including hardware makers, pure guts-of-the-internet tech companies, and marketplaces that serve both consumers and corporations.

Six-year-old AngelPad is much smaller than peer accelerators and seed funds like 500 Startups, TechStars or Y Combinator. It only admits 12 companies per batch. The program takes place in New York, but startups travel to San Francisco for a Demo Day and networking with Silicon Valley investors.

AngelPad typically invests $60,000 in seed funding into each company in its program for 7% of common stock. Korte said “We are always changing our funding formula.” Every company in a cohort has exactly the same terms, however.

Here’s a list of all the startups in the newest batch, listed in the order that they presented before investors at the demo day.

KeyReply – Uses natural language analysis to extract insights from unstructured data, specifically to help customer support and customer service teams work more efficiently.

OutWork – Software-as-a-service to help businesses manage their partnerships with: integrators, API providers or users, resellers, brands, co-marketers and others.

HypeLabs – Creators of a software development kit that lets consumer electronics, or any hardware, connect and communicate even where WiFi and cellular networks aren’t working.

Equire – A marketplace that connects small businesses with investors who want to acquire them.

Polybit – Provides open source tools to help developers build, distribute and manage API’s automatically, so they can focus more on coding their own products.

Oco– Makers of Internet-connected surveillance cameras, including a new one designed for use by stores and small businesses that may be vulnerable to crime.

Moved – An app that helps people prepare for a move and set up all the services they need in their new home.

Lanebeacon – Software-as-a-service that helps guide new users through an app’s various features, and then convert them from free to paying users.

Nexgent – Trains, certifies and helps place employees in IT engineering jobs with online and on-site courses.

UnStock – A mobile marketplace where users can buy or upload and sell videos captured by the newest cameras, from iPhones to 360 cameras or drones.

Mobile Bigfoot – Optimzes wireless connectivity for telecomm operators, so people have a good internet experience, even at crowded sporting events or on a crowded subway platform.

LoftSmart – A reviews site and online marketplace that connects frantic college students or their families with providers of non-dormitory student housing in major college towns.

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