You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

No stars, but lots of community honours

NZ NewswireNZ Newswire 5/06/2016
There are few household names in the Queen's 90th Birthday Honours list, but a good number are recognised for their community work. © Getty Images There are few household names in the Queen's 90th Birthday Honours list, but a good number are recognised for their community work.

There are few household names in the Queen's 90th Birthday Honours list, but a good number are recognised for their community work.

In recent times Richie McCaw, Dan Carter, Jane Campion and Peter Gluckman have all provided the easy headlines for honours list stories.

But this year?

It's hard to describe anyone at the top of Monday's list, which "acknowledges a wide range of people who serve their communities, and recognises those who have achieved something special", as a household name.

Damehoods go to the Court of Appeal's Justice Ellen France and former education system boss Karen Sewell for services to their respective sectors.

Knighthoods have gone to Rob Fenwick for business and conservation, Michael Friedlander for philanthropy, NIWA chairman Christopher Mace for science and education work, Te Runanga O Toa Rangatira executive director Matiu Nohorua, for services to Maori, and retired judge Ronald Young for his legal work.

In all there are 177 names in the list - a mix of people who are good at their jobs and people who are helping out in the community.

The dominant criteria is for services to their community - 41 instances - while services to education, health and Maori rank next. Thirteen are for their business work, five for philanthropy.

Those at the top are honoured for their work in a career they loved.

"After four weeks I realised what fun it was, how much I enjoyed it, and I've stayed in it ever since," Dame Karen said of her 50-year career in education.

Others are recognised for what they did outside their job.

"You've got to fall in love with ideas... being positive and sometimes so optimistic you're pushing the boundaries," businessman Rob Fenwick said of his conservation work.

But others we will know even less about, until the Defence Force decides the public can know.

Two people have received Distinguished Service Decorations, but their names and what they did are not being revealed to protect their families and so operational procedures are not known.

Both were in Iraq last year for "significant contributions towards the success of multi-national operations".

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon