You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

NZ look to exploit Napier boundaries

NZ Newswire logoNZ Newswire 30/01/2017 Angelo Risso

Australia will continue to bash the ball down the ground in the second Chappell-Hadlee ODI in Napier, according to Kiwi boss Mike Hesson.

But this time, it may not be so effective.

The Black Caps eked out a six-run win over their trans-Tasman rivals at Eden Park on Monday, despite an extraordinary lower-order resistance from Marcus Stoinis.

The 27-year-old Stoinis smashed 146 (not out) off 117 balls at No.7 before ultimately being stranded by ninth-drop Josh Hazlewood's run-out.

Stoinis hit nine boundaries and a near-record 11 sixes in the display, eight of which cleared the ropes straight down the ground.

Eden Park's notorious short straight boundary made life easier for Stoinis, with Hesson admitting his bowling attack struggled to prevent shots in that area.

But the challenge for the Australian batsmen would be entirely different in Napier on Thursday, where the square boundary is shorter.

Hitting straight down the ground wouldn't gift quite so many runs.

"We got hit to areas of the park we didn't want to, whereas at McLean Park, that's probably where we want to get hit," Hesson said.

"We'll probably go straighter-ball than wider-ball, and the lengths you bowl are going to be different."

Setting the visitors a healthy total of 287 for victory, the Black Caps cleaned up Australia's specialist batsmen early on, leaving them teetering at 67-6.

But Stoinis simply wouldn't give way, starting his innings conservatively before belting delivery after delivery into the crowd.

He also tallied three wickets with the ball earlier in the day.

Hesson acknowledged the West Australian's knock, the second-highest total from a No.7 in ODI history, was exceptional.

But his own lower order had also done the business, with Neil Broom and No.7 all-rounder Jimmy Neesham saving the Black Caps from collapse at 134-5.

Broom provided the platform for the big-hitting Neesham to score six fours on his way to 48, before upping the ante to hit 73 himself.

Using opener Tom Latham as a wicketkeeper and deploying Colin Munro as a part-time seam bowler also created space for batting quality down the order.

"It always helps when you've got guys who bowl and keep in your top six, it gives you options and allowed us to bat a little deeper," Hesson said.

"We can play five frontline batsmen, which we perhaps haven't been able to do in recent times, so that certainly helps."

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon