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Parents of Canadian hostage: first time we've seen kids

Canadian Press logoCanadian Press 21/12/2016
FILE - This undated militant file image from video posted online in August 2016, which has not been independently verified by The Associated Press, provided by SITE Intel Group, shows Canadian Joshua Boyle and American Caitlan Coleman, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Officials in Canada are calling for the unconditional release of Boyle and his wife following the release of another video on Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, that appears to show them begging for their governments to intervene with their Afghan captors on their behalf. (SITE Intel Group via AP, File) © The Associated Press FILE - This undated militant file image from video posted online in August 2016, which has not been independently verified by The Associated Press, provided by SITE Intel Group, shows Canadian Joshua Boyle and American Caitlan Coleman, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Officials in Canada are calling for the unconditional release of Boyle and his wife following the release of another video on Monday, Dec. 19, 2016, that appears to show them begging for their governments to intervene with their Afghan captors on their behalf. (SITE Intel Group via AP, File)

TORONTO — The parents of a Canadian man held hostage in Afghanistan say a recently released video of his family marks the first time they've seen the two grandchildren, who were born in captivity.

Canadian Joshua Boyle and his American wife, Caitlan Coleman, were kidnapped in 2012 while travelling in Afghanistan.

In a video this week, Coleman — sitting with two young children — urges governments on all sides to reach a deal to secure the family's freedom.

Boyle's parents, Patrick and Linda Boyle, said in statement Wednesday the video is the first glimpse at the kids

The parents say their son told them in a letter that they've tried to protect the children by pretending their signs of captivity are part of a game being played with guards.

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