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Police launch summer campaign with kids

NZ NewswireNZ Newswire 29/11/2016

Anyone who's travelled with children will be familiar with their whinging in the back seat of the car , but the police are now hoping the voices of kids will help lower the road toll this summer.

The New Zealand Police are school children to write poetry to help instil the summer road safety campaign - 'Check Your Speed'.

Wellington kids have written haiku poems in an effort to appeal to the adults in their lives to slow down on the roads this festive season.

Five of the best poems were read at the launch of the 'Check Your Speed' campaign on Tuesday afternoon.

Legendary poet Sam Hunt opened the launch, and recited haikus of his own, with the support of the police, ACC and other road safety partners.

"Anyone with children in the car knows how much weight their voices can have in getting you to slow down. How can you argue with 'we're scared, slow down mum ...' or, 'you're going too fast, dad!" said Dave Cliff, assistant commissioner road policing.

Assistant commissioner Cliff said it's already been a devastating year on the roads, and this year it's about the young voices.

Mr Hunt says he accepted the invitation to be apart of this campaign because he's "seen the devastation and hurt caused by idiots who speed".

"I'm surprised there aren't more crashes. Thank god there aren't."

Children and the general public are now encouraged to write their own haikus to express how they feel about getting to their destination safely.

"The haiku is compact. It's a great campaign and I hope it catches people's awareness and imaginations," said Mr Hunt.

"Police and their road safety partners will be working hard this summer to avoid further road trauma, but we need the public's help to do so," said assistant commissioner Cliff.

The reduced speed threshold of 4km/h will be in place from December 1 to January 31.

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