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Politics professor forced to eat book live on TV after his Jeremy Corbyn election prediction went very wrong

Mirror logo Mirror 10/06/2017 Joshua Taylor

Credits: Twitter © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: Twitter A politics professor ate a book live on TV after a Twitter prediction about Jeremy Corbyn's election result turned out to be very wrong.

Matthew Goodwin, from the University of Kent, said Labour would never get 38% of the vote in the general election after an opinion poll showed Mr Corbyn was closing the gap.

And the academic offered to eat a copy of his new book, Brexit : Why Britain Voted to Leave the European Union, if he was wrong. 

The professor tweeted on May 27: "I'm saying this out loud. I do not believe that Labour, under Jeremy Corbyn , will poll 38%. I will happily eat my new Brexit book if they do."

But Labour actually got 40% of the vote so Prof Goodwin had to keep to his word.

Credits: Twitter © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: Twitter

As he prepared to devour the book live on Sky News during an interview about the election result, he said: "I was surprised Jeremy Corbyn added two percentage points. 

"I did say I would eat this book. Two percentage points makes a big difference.

Credits: Twitter © Provided by Trinity Mirror Shared Services Limited Credits: Twitter "I'm a man of my word. What I'm going to do is just sit here and eat this book while you guys carry on."

The shock election result saw the Tories lose their House of Commons majority and Labour gained 30 seats.

Theresa May is now desperately trying to negotiate a deal with the Democratic Unionist Party to cling to power.

Her two top aides, Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill, resigned over the disastrous campaign.

Meanwhile chief whip Gavin Williamson has reportedly flown to Belfast to hammer out a deal with the DUP .

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