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Rihanna breaks Beatles US chart record

BBC News BBC News 19/04/2016
Mariah Carey's duet with Boyz II Men, One Sweet Day, spent 16 weeks at number one in the US © Reuters Mariah Carey's duet with Boyz II Men, One Sweet Day, spent 16 weeks at number one in the US

Rihanna has overtaken The Beatles record for the total number of weeks spent at number one in the US.

The singer's latest hit Work has scored a ninth week at the top of the Billboard Hot 100, giving her an overall tally of 60 weeks at number one with 14 songs.

That's one more week at number one than The Beatles' overall total.

She is now second on the list of all-time chart toppers, behind Mariah Carey, whose record is 79 weeks.

However, some of the songs counted as a number one for Rihanna are actually collaborations with other artists.

Live Your Life, which spent six weeks at number one in 2008, was performed by rapper T.I. - with Rihanna appearing as a guest vocalist.

Similarly, Monster and Love the Way You Lie were both performed by Eminem, but featured Rihanna singing the choruses.

The two songs spent a combined total of 11 weeks at number one.

Mariah Carey also has some collaborations counted among her 79-week total.

Her duet with Boyz II Men, One Sweet Day, spent 16 weeks at number one in 1995 and 1996.

We Belong Together is her most successful solo single, after spending 14 weeks as a Billboard Hot 100 number one in 2005.

None of the singles by The Beatles to reach the chart summit featured other artists.

The most popular songs by The Beatles in the US were Hey Jude, which spent nine weeks at number one in 1968, and I Want To Hold Your Hand, which was number one for seven weeks in 1964.

Elvis Presley also has a total of 79 weeks - but only if weeks prior to the inception of the Billboard Hot 100 are counted.

The American chart began life in August 1958, after which Presley is credited with having 22 cumulative weeks at the top of the Billboard chart.

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