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Taylor focused on return to Test cricket

NZ Newswire logoNZ Newswire 10/01/2017

Taylor said his left eye, from which he had a growth removed, was improving each week. © DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/Getty Images Taylor said his left eye, from which he had a growth removed, was improving each week. Ross Taylor admits he was disappointed to miss New Zealand's Twenty20 sweep over Bangladesh, but has his focus on the upcoming Test series against the tourists.

After an eye operation, the former Black Caps skipper is set to return to international duty in the opening Test beginning at Wellington's Basin Reserve on Thursday.

Taylor's last innings for his country was an unbeaten 102 - the 16th century of his 78-Test career - against Pakistan in Hamilton in November.

After surgery, the 32-year-old right-hander had two domestic T20 outings for Central Districts at the end of December, scoring 82 not out and 80.

By then, he had already been told he wouldn't be in the Black Caps squad for their three T20s against Bangladesh.

"I love playing all three formats for the country and to get the call on Boxing Day was disappointing, but you have to respect the selectors' decision," he said on Tuesday.

"I guess to answer it back with two 80s was nice. At the same time, it's nice to be back in Test cricket and at one of my favourite grounds."

Taylor was also philosophical about failing to get approval to play for the Melbourne Renegades in their Big Bash clash against the Melbourne Stars on New Year's Day.

While Black Caps coach Mike Hesson didn't have an objection, NZ Cricket chief executive David White ruled it out because of the match's timing.

"It is what it is," Taylor said.

"It would have been nice to have played in front of 70,000-odd in the Melbourne derby but NZC have their protocols on player travel and you have to respect that."

Taylor said his left eye, from which he had a growth removed, was improving each week and his peripheral vision felt better.

"I went around to my manager's house and asked if she had bought a new fridge," he said.

"She looked at me pretty strangely and said it's been the same one for the last four or five years. I don't know if that's a good or a bad thing."

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