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The Business of Athletes and Their Bodies

The Huffington Post The Huffington Post 27/10/2015 Yura Bryant
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Professional athletes push their bodies to the limit every time they perform in high level athletic competition. The key thing to note about athletes pushing their bodies to the limit, is that it is a constant push of extreme exertion season after season. When this continued pressure is placed upon the body, it begins to weaken from being under so much force and can eventually breakdown.
Professional athletes can't afford for their bodies to completely break down early and prematurely force them out of competition. If it happens, then their livelihood is threatened because multi-million dollar contracts and endorsements will no longer exist. Therefore, athletes monitor the ongoing performance of their bodies in order to know if they are losing or gaining in their body's ability to compete at an elite level. But even with around the clock team trainers and excellent eating habits, situations occur where an athlete's body is put through extreme stress. These situations of extreme stress are injuries.
Injuries are something that no athlete wants to go through but they are almost inevitable when your career is within professional sports . When injuries do occur; the time between injury, surgical operation, recovery and back to competing at a high level is a major concern that is carefully monitored. And the responsibility of effective maintenance after an injury occurs, rests firmly on the shoulders of specialized surgeons, who are tasked with the role of transforming injured athletes back into high performing competitors again.
American sports leagues are multi-billion dollar businesses that are built upon the entertainment provided by professional athletes. If athletic performances were to suffer than the business model that professional leagues operate upon would also suffer in the process. Therefore, these professional leagues need elite surgeons on call who can effectively repair athletes so that they can get back to performing for their teams as soon as possible. This not only helps athletes so that they can continue to earn money, but this also helps the athlete's team and professional league continue to earn money.
When it comes to professional athletes, injuries can happen to any part of their body. That means surgeons specializing in particular operations must be immediately available in order to swiftly take care of injuries before they worsen. From a specialized hand specialist to famed athletic surgeons, such as James Andrews, there are experts on speed-dial that help both athletes and their teams stay calm when disaster strikes. This is very important when so much money is on the line.
Take for instance the current situation going on with the Dallas Cowboys and their injured star players. Both Tony Romo and Dez Bryant are injured and the Cowboys have been losing games they may have won if they had a healthy team. This is a team that was favored to make a Super Bowl run and now has a losing record. Their team owner, Jerry Jones, and fans are eagerly waiting for Romo and Bryant's return so that they can get back to winning. But this can only occur if they have been properly repaired to get back on the field and play at elite levels.
That is how important surgeons are to the business of professional sports. They play a role in winning and losing. They play a significant role in players having the ability to sign lucrative contracts, despite past injuries that were viewed as career ending injuries. The list of professional players whose careers were preserved due to highly effective surgery goes on and on. From Peyton Manning to Drew Brees, professional athletes have suffered severe injuries that were only corrected due to the work of world class surgeons. When injured athletes are able to return to your favorite team and help them win, be sure to thank the surgeons who are in the business of helping professional players and their leagues stay in business.

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