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The Hundred We Are... 3 stages of women

The Huffington Post The Huffington Post 29/03/2016 Nancy Cohen-koan

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Having just spent many hours at the Commission on the Status of Women at the UN and taking in so many atrocities of social injustice against my gender, I was hesitant to attend The Hundred We Are, a play about women's issues written by a man. I shouldn't have worried. Jonas Hassen Khemiri, a Swedish playwright, has no problem understanding the plight of women's many life decisions and the regrets that both sexes, but women with historically less opportunity, must feel as they age. In this story, three women play different ages of one, and one speaks as the shadow.
I've seen many shows at the Cell Theatre and the Origin group are always inventive. For this play though, the use of projected words and the balcony space, didn't add much to the story. I wasn't aware of why the one actress (Kitty Chen) wasn't speaking, and though it may have had to do with memorization issues, her acting was so good that I appreciated her pantomime, especially as the voices of the other actors were so strong. They were all terrific; Mirirai Sithole, Caitlin Cisco and especially Orlagh Cassidy, whose range of emotions were full and honest.
I've not seen his other works, and though I do admire the intention, the devise of three women playing aspects of one required too much thinking for me to fully contemplate their plight. When she leaves her husband to travel the world, I wanted to know more about why she felt the need to return to a husband who among other deficits, had smelly pants.
The question of whether to live one's life or worry about the lives of others and even do something for them was particularly timely, having just faced the plight of so many around the world. I imagine that it's a question we may all ask ourselves as we age.
The Origin (George C. Heslin, artistic director) always produces daring political shows. Directed by Erwin Maas, the play runs until April 8.

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