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The Latest: 6-month-old baby among London fire dead

Associated Press logo Associated Press 28/06/2017
Workers remove cladding from Whitebeam Court, in Pendleton, Manchester, Monday June 26, 2017. The list of high-rise apartment towers in Britain that have failed fire safety tests grew to 60, officials said Sunday, revealing the mounting challenge the government faces in the aftermath of London's Grenfell Tower fire tragedy. (Peter Byrne/PA via AP) © The Associated Press Workers remove cladding from Whitebeam Court, in Pendleton, Manchester, Monday June 26, 2017. The list of high-rise apartment towers in Britain that have failed fire safety tests grew to 60, officials said Sunday, revealing the mounting challenge the government faces in the aftermath of London's Grenfell Tower fire tragedy. (Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

LONDON — The Latest on the London high-rise fire (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

A 6-month-old baby found dead in her mother's arms is among the 80 people believed to have perished in London's Grenfell Tower blaze.

Eric Sword, an official at Westminster Coroner's Court, says that Leena Belkadi and her sister Malak Belkadi, aged 8, both died from smoke inhalation on June 14.

Their parents also died in the fire. The family lived on the 20th floor of the 24-story apartment building in west London.

Coroner Fiona Wilcox oversaw hearings into the deaths of seven of the fire's victims, including Leena and Malak, on Wednesday.

They included Mohammed Al Haj Ali, a 23-year-old Syrian refugee whose preliminary cause of death was said to be injuries sustained from falling. His body was found outside the building.

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3:10 p.m.

British police have increased the toll in the Grenfell Tower fire to 80 dead or presumed dead.

Metropolitan Police Det. Supt. Fiona McCormack was updating reporters Wednesday on the June 14 inferno. Police had previously said the fire claimed at least 79 lives.

Earlier Wednesday, Prime Minister Theresa May said authorities have tested 120 high-rise buildings in dozens of areas across Britain and found that all were fitted with external cladding panels that failed fire safety tests.

Flammable cladding has been blamed for the rapid spread of the Grenfell blaze.

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1:30 p.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says that 120 high-rise buildings in 37 parts of Britain have failed fire-safety tests — a 100-percent failure rate.

Authorities are urgently testing buildings' cladding in the wake of the June 14 blaze at London's Grenfell Tower, which killed at least 79 people.

Fire officials say panels affixed to the building's exterior helped the blaze, which began with a refrigerator fire, shoot up the 24-story tower.

The tragedy has prompted hard questions about building regulation and fire safety.

Political leaders are trading accusations about who is to blame. Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn said Wednesday that it showed "the terrible consequences of deregulation and cutting corners."

But May said "there is a very wide issue here" that can't be pinned on any single government.

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