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The Latest: Boeing, Airbus compete for orders at air show

Associated Press logo Associated Press 3 days ago
CORRECTS PLANE MAKERS NAME Boeing planes displayed at Paris Air Show, in Le Bourget, east of Paris, France, Tuesday, June 20, 2017 in Paris. Aviation professionals and spectators are expected at this week's Paris Air Show, coming in, in a thousands from around the world to make business deals. (AP Photo/Michel Euler) © The Associated Press CORRECTS PLANE MAKERS NAME Boeing planes displayed at Paris Air Show, in Le Bourget, east of Paris, France, Tuesday, June 20, 2017 in Paris. Aviation professionals and spectators are expected at this week's Paris Air Show, coming in, in a thousands from around the world to make business deals. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

PARIS — The Latest on the Paris Air Show (all times local):

2:45 p.m.

Boeing has landed a string of new plane deals while Airbus has won lucrative promises at the Paris Air Show, as both plane makers stressed the growing importance of digital technology in aviation.

Boeing announced firm orders Tuesday for more than 45 planes worth $5.4 billion at list prices, though customers routinely negotiate discounts. Buyers included Ryanair, China's Okay Airways and the Aviation Capital Group leasing company.

Boeing also took in tentative orders for a further 83 planes worth as much as $9.3 billion.

Airbus said it had pledges Tuesday for 95 jets worth up to $10.4 billion at list prices.

Most of the orders were for single-aisle jets.

Airbus launched a new digital platform and Boeing forecast big growth in demand for technology and data to guide aviation industry decisions.

High-tech hardware is getting attention at this year's Paris Air Show.

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2:20 p.m.

The head of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration says the boom in drone popularity is "a huge game changer" similar "to powered flight or jet engines."

In an Associated Press interview Tuesday, Michael Huerta said "the growth of this industry and how it's evolving is something that all of us in aviation need to pay a lot of attention to."

Huerta spoke on the sidelines of the Paris Air Show, where drones of all kinds were being displayed.

For the industry, their popularity begs a vital question: how do you make sure that swarms of new machines don't endanger each other, other users of the skies and people on the ground as they do everything from patrolling traffic blackspots to, possibly, delivering your burger and fries?

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