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The Latest: High court weighs deportation case

Associated Press logo Associated Press 28/03/2017
FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in the morning in Washington. The Supreme Court is taking up the case of a longtime U.S. resident who is facing deportation to South Korea after pleading guilty to a drug crime based on his lawyer’s bad advice. The justices are hearing argument March 29 in an appeal by Jae Lee, who has lived in the United States for 35 years and has never been back to South Korea since coming to the United States when he was 13. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File) © The Associated Press FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2017, file photo, the Supreme Court is seen in the morning in Washington. The Supreme Court is taking up the case of a longtime U.S. resident who is facing deportation to South Korea after pleading guilty to a drug crime based on his lawyer’s bad advice. The justices are hearing argument March 29 in an appeal by Jae Lee, who has lived in the United States for 35 years and has never been back to South Korea since coming to the United States when he was 13. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

WASHINGTON — The Latest on the Supreme Court arguments in a deportation case tied to bad legal advice (all times local):

11:40 a.m.

The Supreme Court is trying to figure out whether immigrants should get a second chance in court when bad legal advice leads to a guilty plea and certain deportation.

The justices seemed divided during an argument Tuesday about what to do in cases in which the evidence against criminal defendants is strong and the chances of acquittal by a jury are remote.

The court is considering the case of Jae (JAY) Lee, a South Korean immigrant who was facing drug charges.

Lee pleaded guilty after his lawyer mistakenly assured him a conviction would not lead to deportation.

The Trump administration is arguing the outcome at trial would have been the same. The administration has pledged to increase deportations, with a focus on immigrants who have been convicted of crimes.

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3:30 a.m.

The Supreme Court is taking up the case of a longtime U.S. resident who is facing deportation to South Korea after pleading guilty to a drug crime based on his lawyer's bad advice.

The justices are hearing argument Tuesday in an appeal by Jae (JAY) Lee, who has lived in the United States for 35 years and has never been back to South Korea since coming to the United States when he was 13.

The case has taken on increased importance because President Donald Trump has promised to step up deportations, with a special focus on immigrants who have been convicted of crimes. The American Bar Association has estimated that one of every 10 criminal defendants is not an American citizen.

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