You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

This father put his children through college. But a prosecutor says he ‘executed’ one of them.

The Washington Post logo The Washington Post 11/10/2016 Kristine Guerra

his September 2016 booking file photo provided by the Rocky River, Ohio, Division of Police shows Jamal T. Mansour in Rocky River, Ohio, charged with murder in the Sept. 27 fatal shooting of his adult daughter Tahani Mansour at their suburban Cleveland home. Jamal Mansour was indicted on murder charges Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016. © Rocky River, Ohio, Division of Police via AP, File his September 2016 booking file photo provided by the Rocky River, Ohio, Division of Police shows Jamal T. Mansour in Rocky River, Ohio, charged with murder in the Sept. 27 fatal shooting of his adult daughter Tahani Mansour at their suburban Cleveland home. Jamal Mansour was indicted on murder charges Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016.

Jamal Mansour had a big get-together with his family just four days before he allegedly shot and killed his 27-year-old daughter.

He had even bought dresses and bracelets for his daughters during a recent trip to Jerusalem, his attorney, Angelo Lonardo, told The Washington Post.

Nothing, it seemed, could explain why Mansour — a father of four girls and two boys — would allegedly shoot the youngest of his children twice in the head.

“This does not make any sense,” Lonardo said. “It’s extremely uncharacteristic of the man who had put his daughters through college so that they could achieve their dreams in life.”

Mansour, 63, was indicted Wednesday on charges of murder, aggravated murder and felonious assault.

The grand jury indictment comes about a week after Tahani Mansour, a clinical pharmacist at the world-renowned Cleveland Clinic, was fatally shot in her bedroom in her family’s home in Rocky River, Ohio, about 10 miles outside Cleveland.

The shooting occurred in the early morning hours of Sept. 27. Rocky River Prosecutor Michael O’Shea said Jamal Mansour “executed” his daughter, shooting her once in the front of her head and again in the back after she fell down.

“It’s almost like a professional hit man had done this,” O’Shea told The Post. “My opinion is that he got into that room with the purpose of killing his daughter. That wasn’t an accidental shooting. That’s an execution.”

O’Shea said the handgun that was used was a revolver, which required a much heavier trigger pull than a semiautomatic weapon. It’s unclear whether the gun belonged to Jamal Mansour, or whether he had a permit to carry it.

Other family members were in the house at the time of the shooting, O’Shea said. One of Tahani Mansour’s brothers, who called 911, told police that his sister was unconscious and breathing, but was bloodied and twitching, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Tahani Mansour, O’Shea said, went through surgery and hung on for almost a day.

“The poor girl fought like crazy to live,” he said. “She was a fighter.”

The youngest of six siblings, Tahani Mansour had a doctoral degree in pharmacy and had just been hired at the Cleveland Clinic, according to the Associated Press. She graduated from Northeast Ohio Medical University in 2013.

Philip King, a former classmate, told the AP that Tahani Mansour embraced the challenges of a rigorous pharmacy program and enjoyed hanging out with friends.

He said her time at school and with her friends allowed her to enjoy freedom that she might not have had at home. Her family, King said, was “very, very protective” of her.

At one point, Tahani Mansour confided that she feared her father, King said, though he doesn’t know any details.

“I didn’t ask,” King told the AP. “I knew there were cultural reasons.”

The motive for the alleged crime is unclear. The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported that the shooting occurred during an argument.

In 2012, O’Shea said, Jamal Mansour became upset after his daughter attended a pharmacy convention in Las Vegas. An anonymous caller told authorities that he threatened to kill himself because of his daughter’s business trip, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Lonardo, his attorney, remained tight-lipped about the relationship between his client and his daughter, other than to say Jamal Mansour is a hardworking man who loves his family and who put his children through college and graduate school.

He added that his client had been mentally and physically sick for a long time, though he declined to comment further.

Jamal Mansour moved to the United States from Jordan in 1978, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported. He became a U.S. citizen in 1982. He and other family members own several convenience stores in the Ohio area.


More from The Washington Post

The Washington Post
The Washington Post
image beaconimage beaconimage beacon