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Sir Alex Ferguson Imposed A Brutal Rule About Young Players And Their Cars

Esquire logo Esquire 4/09/2017 The Editors

I Sir Alex Ferguson Imposed A Brutal Rule About Young Players And Their Cars © Provided by Hearst Communications, Inc Sir Alex Ferguson Imposed A Brutal Rule About Young Players And Their Cars It recently emerged that while at Old Trafford, Fergie encouraged coaching staff to turn a blind eye whenever Ronaldo¬†dramatically rolled around on the floor in pain.

And it seems his Jedi-level mind games to toughen up the younger players didn't stop there.

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Speaking on talkSPORT, Wayne Rooney discussed his time under the celebrated manager and revealed that young players were banned from having flash cars, despite earning more than enough to own several.

"When Alex Ferguson was there, if you were under 25 then you couldn't have a sports car," he said.

"Fergie was the best. He never complicated anything," he added. "Nowadays sometimes there is a bit too much information and a bit too much thought going into it. Sometimes you just need a 'we're better than you' moment. He had the balance right. His man management was second to none. He knew the players he could have a go at and the players to put his arm round."

© Provided by Hearst Communications, Inc Speaking of Fergie's infamous dressing room treatment after a bad game, Rooney admitted a few players had shed tears after receiving his 'hairdryer treatment' with himself and Ryan Giggs falling victim often.

"I've seen players in the dressing room at half time with tears running down their face because a manager has had a go at them and they can't take it."

"I've been there myself where Alex Ferguson has had a go at me. It gives me that lift and makes you want it more," he said. "Me and Giggs were the two players he had a go at most but I think he knew that when he had a go we were the two who had the character to go out and improve on the performance."

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