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Accused in WA 'Evil 8' case bailed again

AAP logoAAP 19/08/2016

A West Australian man accused of sexually abusing a teenage girl who was pimped by her father has had his bail extended again and been granted an adjournment despite being told at his last court appearance further delays would not be tolerated.

Alfred John Impicciatore, 46, faces six charges including four counts of sexually penetrating a child aged between 13 and 16.

Impicciatore sought a substantial adjournment when he faced Perth Magistrates Court last month, but was told the case had dragged on long enough and he would not be allowed to delay the matter further.

When he sought a further adjournment on Friday, magistrate Felicity Zempilas said she'd only grant a one-week adjournment and extend his bail.

"There needs to be some progress on that date," she said.

Eight men were originally named in the notorious case, with the group dubbed the "Evil 8" by local media, but that number is now down to seven as one of them was not charged with offences in relation to the girl.

Those jailed including the victim's father, who is appealing his 22 year sentence, and former pastor Dawid Volmer, who was handed 10-and-a-half years behind bars.

Two are awaiting sentencing, including Ryan Trevor Clegg, who sparked outrage this week after it was revealed he breached his bail conditions by living close to a daycare centre and a school.

After a public outcry, WA Attorney-General Michael Mischin proposed legislative changes that would make it tougher for serious sex offenders to secure bail while awaiting sentence.

Clegg, 42, pleaded guilty to 61 charges including four counts of sexually penetrating a child and is now in custody.

However, Nicholas Adam Beer, 36, is living some 500m from a school as he awaits sentencing on 163 counts next month.

Opposition leader Mark McGowan said Impicciatore's bail extension showed the legislative changes were overdue.

"Here we have further evidence that across the government and perhaps the judiciary, lessons have not been learned," Mr McGowan told reporters.

"This case was so extreme, the people involved have allegedly committed crimes of such an extreme nature, I think the community would have expected the people wouldn't have been given bail."

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