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Another challenge to Rayney's legal career

AAP logoAAP 6/11/2016 Rebecca Le May

Prominent Perth barrister Lloyd Rayney is facing another challenge to his right to practise law, this time by the Legal Profession Complaints Committee.

The Legal Practice Board struck him off in July 2015, claiming he was not a fit and proper person.

But he immediately challenged the decision in the State Administrative Tribunal and had his certificate reinstated in February, with the SAT noting he was "regarded as, and was, of impeccable character" before he was charged with his estranged wife Corryn's murder in 2007.

Mr Rayney was acquitted in 2012 and a phone interception case against him that followed was thrown out of court.

He's now suing the state for defamation after a senior detective publicly named him the prime and only suspect in the murder investigation, with a six-week civil trial scheduled to start on February 27.

It will be heard by a judge alone after the Supreme Court accepted his argument the unprecedented amount of adverse publicity against him meant he would not get a fair trial before a six-person jury.

Mr Rayney has always denied any involvement in his wife's death and says his legal career has never recovered from the damage caused by the murder allegation.

That was despite being found not guilty after a three-month trial - with Justice Brian Martin effectively ruling Ms Rayney was the victim of a random attack - and prosecutors failing in their bid to appeal the acquittal.

Mr Rayney's lawyer Martin Bennett told reporters after a directions hearing for the defamation trial on Friday that the SAT had reserved its decision regarding the Legal Profession Complaints Committee application.

The committee receives all complaints about solicitors and barristers in WA, while the board is responsible for regulating all legal practitioners.

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