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Bradman's grandson smashes school result

AAP logoAAP 5/01/2017 Marnie Banger

The grandson of Sir Donald Bradman may not play cricket but he's smashed his Year 12 results out of the ground and into the car park.

Nick Bradman is among the Australian school-leavers who received their International Baccalaureate Diploma results this week, earning a superb score of 44 out of 45, equivalent to an ATAR of 99.95 in SA.

The graduate of Adelaide's Pembroke School says he is happy with the result, which just eclipses Sir Donald's batting average of 99.94, and he is now excited to take some time out.

The 18-year-old says he will take a gap year in 2017, during which he will work more hours at his cafe job, read the books he's been accumulating and travel to Europe and America.

He would then like to study law, as a double degree coupled with arts or politics depending on whether he studies in Adelaide, Melbourne or Canberra.

He says he has been influenced by his parents and sister who have been involved with law but will need more time to decide where he would like the qualification to take him.

"I'm not sure if I'd in the long term be interested in being a practising lawyer. I might choose to use that degree in other fields, possibly like politics," Nick told AAP.

He said he is proud of his link to his legendary grandfather, who died when he was just a few years old, but it is not something that he wants to define him.

He said he played cricket in his junior school years but stopped as he found the games too long and because he wanted to avoid increasing pressure to reflect Sir Donald's prowess.

"That pressure could have become a bit more significant. I don't think it would have been a comfortable experience for me," he said.

"I'm obviously never going to be able to emulate his achievements in cricket so I don't know - to me it's always been more appealing to do my own thing."

The teenager said he was grateful to his school teachers for helping him succeed at school and that there was no secret to getting a good score, but hard work and persistence helped.

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