You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Crowd gathers to support Vollers

AAP logoAAP 11/10/2016

The sister of the man whose treatment in the NT's Don Dale Youth Detention Centere sparked a royal commission says he can't be expected to give evidence while still in custody.

Kirra Voller said her brother Dylan should be release immediately while speaking to a rally in Sydney, where about 150 gathered to call for an end to what they say is systemic racism across Australia.

She told the passionate crowd the 19-year-old, whose shocking and apparently abusive treatment featured in the Four Corners report that prompted the inquiry, couldn't be expected to give evidence against authorities while still being detained.

"He's scared to tell us things," she said on Tuesday night.

"It's scary to think that my brother's still in government care."

Dylan's mother Joanne stood silently as her daughter addressed the crowd, with both women appearing to cry as they pleaded for compassion.

The protest comes as the royal commission into juvenile justice opened in Darwin and heard conditions at the Don Dale Youth Detention Centre routinely breached children's human rights.

A similar demonstration was held outside the Darwin Supreme Court, where people waved banners reading "no justice" and "disadvantage shouldn't be a life sentence".

Local Aboriginal leader Kath Mills said the government is ignoring its responsibility to protect indigenous youths.

"Stop the bulls***. Start treating Aboriginal people as human beings with rights," she said.

"This doesn't only belong to Darwin, it's happening in every corner of Australia. But it's all being covered over, the silence is deafening."

The commission, which is being led by Margaret White and Mick Gooda, will look at the years between August 2006 and August 2016.

A final report is due by the end of March 2017.

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon