You are using an older browser version. Please use a supported version for the best MSN experience.

Hanson 'confident' of no bad Qld apples

AAP logoAAP 18/12/2016 Jamie McKinnell

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson is "as confident as anyone can possibly be" there are no bad apples in her batch of 36 newly-announced Queensland election candidates, but admits there are no guarantees.

The party's vetting process for the Queensland poll has also been tightened after the resignation from One Nation of maverick Senator Rod Culleton.

"We've actually knocked back some candidates," Senator Hanson said in Brisbane on Monday.

The party on Sunday announced an initial 36 candidates to contest state seats in the poll, due by early 2018, including US-born Donald Trump supporter Jane Truscott and former Liberal National Party MP Neil Symes.

"They've been through a very tight, stringent test of questions and asking where their loyalties lie," Senator Hanson said.

"I actually had a good talk with them yesterday virtually saying if you don't intend to be loyal (and) work as a team, please, you're not here."

Asked how confident she was there were no bad apples in the batch, the senator replied: "As confident as anyone can possibly be."

She added: "There's no guarantees in life."

Senator Hanson has also declared she would be ready for a snap poll as early as February 2017, predicting the rising popularity of One Nation will force the government's hand.

She rejected suggestions the turbulent episodes with Senator Culleton, whom she labelled as "a pain in my backside", could turn Queensland voters off the party.

"Support is just coming through very strongly for myself," Senator Hanson said.

"People are saying good riddance to him, he's not a team player.

Acting Premier Curtis Pitt said the current redistribution of electoral boundaries, which will increase the number of state seats from 89 to 94, won't be complete until mid to late February.

"I think it would be good for all parties concerned to actually have an understanding of where the boundaries may lie going towards the next election," Mr Pitt said.

image beaconimage beaconimage beacon