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Northern NSW remains state's DV hot spot

AAP logoAAP 6/12/2016 Andrew Leeson

Some of the most disadvantaged areas in NSW have the highest rates of domestic violence, according to the latest crime statistics.

Three regions in the state's north - Walgett, Moree Plains and Coonamble - recorded domestic violence incidents that were more than double the state average in the 12 months to September, a NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) report has revealed.

The areas each ranked among the 15 most socio-economically disadvantaged in NSW in 2011, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics.

NSW Police Minister Troy Grant said domestic violence statewide remained stable, rising just 0.7 per cent in two years, and pointed out a larger area covering Walgett was trending down.

"It's really encouraging to see this reduction in domestic violence, particularly in the far west and Orana, where the recorded rate of domestic assaults had been nearly three times the state average," Mr Grant said.

Walgett, which had the highest rates of domestic violence in 2015, was trending down by 30 per cent over two years but in the same period Wagga Wagga, Gosford and Maitland were trending upwards.

"While there is still a lot of work to be done to address this scourge, the NSW government is determined to break the cycle of domestic violence that has plagued our state for far too long," Mr Grant said.

Meanwhile, the number of people being charged with robbery in NSW has fallen in two years but shop theft, drug use and custody escapes have jumped.

As well, the majority of crimes across the state including murder and sexual assaults remained at a stable levels over the 24 months to September.

NSW Police Commissioner Andrew Scipione praised his officers for the falling crime rates.

"I am proud of the work they do and today's results are clear indication of their daily dedication and resilience in performing their duties," Mr Scipione said.

National domestic violence helpline: 1800 737 732 or 1800RESPECT. In an emergency call triple-zero.

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