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NT Aboriginals 'most policed' in Australia

AAP logoAAP 18/08/2016 Neda Vanovac

Indigenous people in the Northern Territory are the most policed in the country, a land council representative said.

The Central and Northern Land Councils held a full joint meeting at Kalkarindji in central Australia on Thursday and several members told both Chief Minister Adam Giles and Opposition Leader Michael Gunner that ever since the 2007 intervention they had felt disempowered as parents, which has led to an increase in youth crime.

Leaders were particularly unhappy about the Four Corners program on abuse of young Aboriginal inmates in Darwin's Don Dale youth detention centre.

"We are the most policed people in the territory, let alone Australia," said Barbara Shaw, from Alice Springs.

"The worst thing the intervention ever did was take us adults off the street and put our children in the street."

She said she spoke with the mother of Dylan Voller, the boy shown hooded and tied to a chair in the most shocking footage on Four Corners.

"Joanne Voller came to me when she first saw her son with a mark on him when she went to visit him. You see the footage of that little boy? She was actually on the phone, she heard the screws slapping her son around, she couldn't do anything," Ms Shaw said.

"Why can't these screws go to jail for beating and stripping our boys?"

Mr Gunner said everyone involved would be held accountable.

"The royal commission is a very serious thing and it's going to drag up in front of it ministers and public servants and guards, and everyone's going to be held to account," he said.

Ms Shaw also told the meeting that the Country Liberals government's slew of alcohol and policing measures unfairly targeted Aboriginal people living in remote communities, and said black market alcohol vendors had sprung up as a result.

"The rest of Australia, they look at us as useless blackfellas, women-beaters, child-rapists, mothers and fathers that can't look after our children, that's how they stereotype us and that's because it's come out of Canberra through the intervention," she said.

If elected on August 27, Mr Gunner said, Labor would reinstate the Banned Drinkers Register and would support communities coming up with their own alcohol management plans, rather than blanket alcohol bans.

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