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One Nation coming for Qld's major parties

AAP logoAAP 17/12/2016 Sarah Motherwell

Pauline Hanson has one message for the leaders of Queensland: "We're coming after you and your jobs".

The One Nation founder has unveiled 36 "very closely" vetted candidates to contest the state election, with more to be announced next month.

"The candidates have come to me - they saw One Nation as the way," Ms Hanson said in Brisbane on Sunday.

Senator Hanson was tight-lipped about the party's policies for the election, which is due to be held in 2018 or earlier, but spoke broadly about affordable housing, reducing congestion, boosting jobs and building infrastructure.

"I'm not going to show my hand and my policies but Queenslanders will love it," she said.

Senator Hanson said she believed One Nation would do better than previous elections because it would not be put last by the major parties.

Specifically, she said she had heard Labor was going to put the Liberal National Party last in preferences.

"We're destined to win some seats in the next parliament," she said.

"We're coming after you (the major parties) and your jobs because I don't feel you deserve to be there.

"You have not listened to grassroots Australians."

Recent polls show support for One Nation has risen into the double digits in Queensland and the election is seen by many as its best chance to pick up seats since 1998 when it won 11 seats.

The party is seen as a threat to both sides and given neither Labor nor the LNP currently holds a majority, it may only need to pick up a handful of seats to hold the balance of power.

Federal Finance Minister Mathias Cormann acknowledged One Nation was competition to the LNP, but one they could take on.

"We'll do everything we can to explain why people should put their trust in us to provide good government, whether that's in Queensland or nationally or in Western Australia, for that matter," he told Sky News on Sunday.

Labor frontbencher Jim Chalmers said his party took the electoral threat One Nation posed very seriously.

"We understand that not just in Queensland but right around the country there are people who are sufficiently disillusioned with the government and with politics as usual to consider other alternatives," he told reporters in his home city of Brisbane.

"Obviously One Nation will field their candidates, we take those candidates seriously and we will engage on the issues in a respectful way."

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk on Saturday said Senator Hanson and her colleague Malcolm Roberts should be spending more time fighting for the state in the Senate.

"They have got to start delivering for Queensland and frankly I haven't seen any of that yet."

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