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'Overwhelmed' Qld asylum-seeker released

AAP logoAAP 21/09/2016 Jamie McKinnell

An Iranian asylum seeker who was removed from her Brisbane community months before her high school graduation is "overwhelmed" after being granted a bridging visa.

Yeronga State High School student Mojgan Shamsalipoor, 22, walked free from the Brisbane Immigration Transit Accommodation Centre on Wednesday.

A failed visa application saw Ms Shamsalipoor placed in detention in August 2015 and she was taken to Darwin, prompting a campaign by her former high school friends and teachers to set her free.

Deputy Principal Jessica Walker said Ms Shamsalipoor had been offered a bridging visa and reunited with her husband, Milad Jafari.

"Mojgan's planning to live with her husband and his family," she told AAP.

"She's just really overwhelmed with being free and being able to just walk where she wants, do what she wants, go shopping - all the simple things in life we take for granted."

Prior to her detention, Ms Shamsalipoor planned to become a midwife and Ms Walker said that dream was still "very much in her heart".

The campaign to free her prompted Immigration Minister Peter Dutton to personally look into the case last year.

But he also defended the government's right to take action against those who made failed visa applications.

Ms Shamsalipoor arrived in Australia by boat in 2012 after fleeing sexual abuse and an arranged marriage to man in his 60s in Iran.

She had lived in Australia for two years on a bridging visa before a further application was rejected.

Ms Walker said the high school would plan a special graduation ceremony once the school holidays were over.

She thanked all the supporters who contributed to the campaign.

"So many people have reached out in love and compassion and without their love and messages of support this could have been a very different journey."

A spokesman for Mr Dutton said a number of "illegal maritime arrivals" had been released in line with the government's decision to reduce the number of people in detention.

"All have been found not to be owed protection by Australia," he said in a statement.

"They are not refugees and are expected to return to their countries of origin."

"They will not have access to permanent stay visas."

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