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Qld opposition demands lockout certainty

AAP logoAAP 1/01/2017 Jamie McKinnell

The Queensland government won't say whether it will shelve its 1am lockout laws if evidence shows alcohol-fuelled violence has already declined during the first six months of its plan to tackle the problem.

The controversial move is due to come into play on February 1 and there are reports the government is preparing to scrap or delay the changes.

The first tranche of the staggered legislation was passed last year, including a two-year review process.

Acting Premier Jackie Trad on Monday said the first part of that review would shed light on whether the plan had worked in the first six months.

She refused to say whether the 1am lockout could be off the table.

"It is not my decision solely to make," Ms Trad said.

"What I am saying is once the evidence and the data comes in of that first six months that the laws have been in place, then we will be having a conversation as a government."

Labor would make a decision "in the interest of Queenslanders based on a Queensland experience", she added.

Acting opposition leader Deb Frecklington said the industry and patrons were "screaming out" for certainty.

"The opposition has always opposed the lockout laws," Ms Frecklington said.

"This is a backdown of epic proportions."

Ms Frecklington said it would be a win for the industry and a win for the opposition.

The opposition said that six months ago Ms Palaszczuk emphatically vowed, during budget estimates, to follow through with the lockout.

Shadow attorney-general Ian Walker criticised the government for overturning his party's strategy to tackle alcohol-fuelled violence, which included 60 points to reduce the issues.

"The Labor party overturned our scanning and banning proposal and instead relied upon the magic bullet of lockouts," he said.

"The person that's been locked out here is Annastacia Palaszczuk."

Ms Frecklington also claimed the potential backdown put at risk the job of State Development Minister Anthony Lynham, a former surgeon who "staked his claim as minister" on the lockout after dealing with the consequences of alcohol-related violence throughout his former career.

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